Statute

Training

Certification

Documentation

Comfort/
Emotional Support Animals

Service Animals-in-Training

Enforcement Entities

Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA)

Yes. Under the ADA, a service animal must be individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability. Service animals can be professionally trained or trained by the handler themselves.

No. Under Title II (State and Local Government) and Title III (Public Accommodations, meaning private businesses), a service animal handler does not need to provide certification for his or her service animal.

Yes. Title I of the ADA, regarding employment, does not specifically address service animals in the workplace, so they are considered a reasonable accommodation. As such, documentation may be requested by an employer.

No. Comfort animals do not have rights under the ADA. For example, businesses to do not have the legal obligation to admit a comfort animal if there is a “no pets” policy, as under the ADA these animals are in essence “pets”.

No. The ADA does not address service animals-in-training, but rather gives each independent state the right to make its own laws regarding the rights of service animals-in-training.

Dept. of Justice
[Federal -
Titles II&III]



Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
[Federal -Title I]


State Legislation
[Local]

Alaska

Duty to Disabled Pedestrians

Interference With Rights of Physically or Mentally Challenged Person

Interference with the Training of a Service Animal

Yes. According to Alaska law, a service animal is trained to assist a physically or mentally challenged person.

Sometimes. When the issue is for drivers to take precaution to avoid injuring service animals or handlers, Alaska law does not mention certification as necessary for a “service animal”. Otherwise, service animals are referred to as “certified service animals” in Alaska law. Thus, certification from an authorized training school can be required for access with a service animal in the case of private and public businesses, transportation, etc.

No. Alaska law does not address a requirement of documentation or identification, including unique dog tags, with regards to service animals.

No. Alaska law does not address the rights of comfort or emotional support animals.

Yes. Service animals-in-trainings do have rights under Alaska law. They must be accompanied by an “authorized” trainer, and be identified by wearing a device or exhibiting an insignia approved by a school, agency, or other facility that trains service animals.

Alaska Statute

AS 09.65.150
AS 11.76.130
AS 11.76.133

Idaho

Consolidated Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws

Yes. According to Idaho Code, anassistance dog” is either a dog that has been trained as a “guide dog”, for a person who is blind or has a vision disability; a “hearing dog”, for a person with a hearing disability; or a “service dog”, for a person with a physical disability.

No. There are no legal requirements for service animals to be specially certified, or for handlers to have proof of service animal status by certification.

No. Idaho Code does not address a requirement of documentation or identification, including unique dog tags, with regards to service animals.

No. Idaho Code does not address the rights of comfort or emotional support animals.

Yes. Idaho Code recognizes service animals-in-training, and thus businesses, public programs, and workplaces have a legal obligation to allow access to service animals-in-training. Idaho Code does stipulate that the “dog-in-training” will wear a jacket, collar, scarf or other similar article to identify it as a dog-in-training.

Idaho Code

IC 56.701-707

Oregon

Assistance Dogs for Person Who are Blind or Deaf

Assistance Dogs for Persons with Physical Impairment

Yes. Oregon defines an “assistance animal” as any animal trained to assist a person with a physical disability in one or more daily life activities. This umbrella term includes, but is not limited to, “dog guides”, trained to lead or guide a person who is blind; and “hearing ear dogs”, trained to assist a person who is deaf.

No. There are no legal requirements for service animals to be specially certified, or for handlers to have proof of service animal status by certification.

No. The Oregon does not address a requirement of documentation or identification, including unique dog tags, with regards to service animals.

No. Oregon does not address the rights of comfort or emotional support animals.

Yes. Oregon recognizes the rights of “assistance animal trainees”, defined as any animal undergoing training to assist a person with a physical impairment. This includes “hearing ear dog trainees” and “dog guide trainees”.

Oregon Revised Statutes

ORS 346

Washington State

Law Against Discrimination;

White Cane Law;

Layla’s Law

Yes. Washington State law defines a service animal as an animal that is trained to accommodate or assist a sensory, mental, or physical disability of a person with a disability. The law also defines a “dog guide” as a dog trained to guide persons who are blind, or trained to assist persons who are hearing impaired.

No. There are no legal requirements for service animals to be specially certified, or for handlers to have proof of service animal status by certification.

No. Washington State law does not address a requirement of documentation or identification, including unique dog tags, with regards to service animals.

No. Comfort or emotional support animals do not have rights under Washington State law.

No. Washington State Law does not address service animals-in-training. A program or facility certainly can allow a service animal-in-training access, but it is under no legal obligation to do so.

Revised Code of Washington

RCW 49.60
RCW 70.84
RCW 9.91.170

Fair Housing Act
(FHA)

No, not necessarily. Under the FHA, an individual must have a disability-related need for the animal. However, the function of the assistance or emotional support animal may be one that they are not necessarily trained to do.

No. Even if the assistance animal is a reasonable accommodation, the housing entity may not require certification to verify the assistance animal’s status as such.

Yes. Housing entities may request documentation of a tenant’s disability and/or a letter of support from a treating physician to confirm that the tenant does need the assistance animal.

Yes. Under the FHA, housing entities must admit any type of “assistance animal”, a term which includes service animals as well as comfort animals or emotional support animals.

No. Service animals-in-training are not addressed in the FHA. These rights are determined by individual state laws.

Dept. of Housing and Urban Development
(HUD)

Air Carrier Access Act
(ACAA)

Yes. The ACAA defines a service animal as “any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability”. U.S. air carriers and their foreign partners must recognize service animals and consider their presence in the cabin to be a reasonable modification of policy.

No. The ACAA says that air carriers must accept service animals based on any type of identification or “the credible verbal assurances of a qualified individual with a disability using the animal”.

Yes. Despite what the ACAA says, the Dept. of Transportation (DOT) requires air carriers to ask for documentation when a passenger would like his or her service animal to travel within the cabin. A letter from a treating physician or vocational caseworker would be sufficient to meet the DOT requirement.
With regards to psychiatric service animals or emotional support animals, air carriers may ask for more extensive documentation from a mental health professional.

Yes. Under the ACAA, U.S. air carriers and their foreign partners must allow emotional support animals in the cabin if requested.

No. The ACAA does not address service animals-in-training and is not required to carry them as they do not meet the requirements of a “service animal” according to this statute. However, carriers are free to make their own individual policies with regards to carrying any pets, including service animals-in-training, provided they comply with the Animal Welfare Act and are consistent with health and safety codes.

Aviation Consumer Protection Division;
Dept. of Transportation (DOT)