2009 Fall Speaker Series

During the fall of 2009, the Arctic FASD RTC in conjunction with the Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services presented a series  of free two hour public lectures on topics related to FASDs. Read below to find out more.
 
October 22: FASDs and Suicide, presented by Michael Baldwin, M.S.

Arctic FASD RTC Affiliate Faculty Member Michael Baldwin has worked as a behavioral health clinician and advocate for children, adolescents, adults and families affected by the consequences of FASDs for nearly 20 years. For seven years, he coordinated a multi-disciplinary FASD Diagnostic Clinic and Prevention Program.

On October 22, he discussed the relationship between FASDs and suicide ideation, attempts, and completion. Mr. Baldwin addressed this topic from his experience as a clinician and based on research data he has collected over the last decade.

Mr. Baldwin is the author of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Suicidality in a Healthcare Setting, published in the International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 2007:66(Suppl.1):54-60.

Target Audience

  • Health and allied health professionals
  • Students in health and allied health programs
  • Parents and caregivers
  • Educators
  • Professionals who may work with individuals with FASD
  • Community members interested in learning more about FASD

Prerequisites

  • No previous knowledge of FASD is required.

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify how the characteristics of individuals with FASD might contribute to suicidality.
  • Identify the implications of FASD for suicide assessment intervention. 
 
November 19: Building Partnerships, presented by Cheri Scott

Cheri Scott has years of experience working in the development and application of FASD training and support projects as a parent navigator and trainer at Stone Soup Group, a nonprofit organization serving families of Alaskan children and youth with special needs. Ms. Scott manages the statewide FASD Family Support Program and is the trainer for parent navigators with the FASD diagnostic teams in Alaska. On November 19, 2009, she presented a lecture based on her experiences in the field of family support and advocacy.

Target Audience

  • Health and allied health professionals
  • Students in health and allied health programs
  • Parents and caregivers
  • Educators
  • Professionals who may work with individuals with FASD
  • Community members interested in learning more about FASD

Prerequisites

  • No previous knowledge of FASD is required.

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role of the parent navigator in the FASD diagnostic process.
  • Identify the role of healthcare providers in referral of and on-going care for individuals experiencing prenatal alcohol exposure.
  • Identifiy strategies for developing collaborative relationships with individuals experiencing FASDs and their caregivers.

 

 
December 17: Adapting Mental Health Practices, presented by Michael Baldwin, M.S.

Michael Baldwin has worked as a behavioral health clinician and advocate for children, adolescents, adults and families affected by the consequences of FASDs for nearly 20 years. For seven years, he coordinated a multi-disciplinary FASD Diagnostic Clinic and Prevention Program.

On December 17, 2009, Mr. Baldwin provided information about adapting mental health practices for individuals with FASD. He addressed this topic from his experience as a clinician and based on research data he has collected over the last decade.

Target Audience

  • Health and allied health professionals
  • Students in health and allied health programs
  • Parents and caregivers
  • Educators
  • Professionals who may work with individuals with FASD
  • Community members interested in learning more about FASD

Prerequisites

  • No previous knowledge of FASD is required.

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the basic neurobehavioral symptoms of FASDs.
  • Explain the concept of secondary FASD behavioral symptoms and provide examples.
  • Describe why standard behavioral strategies are often a poor fit for people with FASDs.
  • Describe and give examples of how mental health treatment can be adapted for individuals with FASDS.
  • Describe and give examples of FASD-tailored treatment goals and objectives.