CLASSES IN COMPLEXITY

 

The following courses are offered on the University of Alaska Anchorage campus on a regular basis. You may register for UAA courses directly through our website. Please feel free to contact the Complex Systems Group at 907.786.4748 should you require additional information. 

The specific information for the current term may be found here:  https://uaonline.alaska.edu/banprod/owa/bwck2sch.p_disp_dyn_sched


CPLX A200 Introduction to Complexity
An introduction to the science of complexity, currently used to predict system behavior in the physical, life, and social sciences. 
Crosslisted with: BIOL A200
3.0 Credit hours

CPLX A394 Modeling of Complex Systems
Presents models of complex systems at an intermediate level of students interested in interdisciplinary methods of natural and complex systems.
Crosslisted with: CSCE A394
3.0 Credit hours 

 

COURSES OFFERED DURING PREVIOUS SEMESTERS

 

University of Alaska Anchorage

BIOL A200 Introduction to Complexity
An introduction to the science of complexity, currently used to predict system behavior in the physical, life, and social sciences. Emphasis is placed on complex systems in biology.
Instructor: Dr. Ben Curtis
Matanuska-Susitna College 

BIOL A485/A685 Biocomplexity/Advanced Biocomplexity
An exploration of the applications of complexity theory to topics in biology. Topics to be considered include scaling laws in biology, self-organization, agent-based models of biological patterns and evolutionary processes, bioinformatics and information dynamics in biological systems, and algorithms as a theoretical basis for interpreting biology. Includes a student-directed agent-based modeling project.
Instructor: Dr. Kim Peterson

CS A351 Automata, Algorithms, and Complexity
Study of the theory of computing and algorithm analysis and design. Topics include: context-free grammars and parsing, finite automata and regular languages; pushdown automata and context-free grammars, deterministic and nondeterministic Turing machines, decidability, and computability. In the algorithm domain, the course provides an introduction to analysis and complexity of algorithms, searching/sorting algorithms, mathematical algorithms, and graph theoretic algorithms. Introduction to complexity theory.
Instructor: Dr. Kenrick Mock

CHEM A453 Inorganic Chemistry II
A study of structures, bondings, and reaction mechanisms of d- and f-block elements.
Instructor: Dr. Jerzy Maselko

LOG A662 Supply Chain Knowledge Management
Study of techniques for managing the information system used within the community of practitioners operating in the global supply chain.
Instructor: Dr. Hermann Gruenwald

LOG A665 Supply Chain Measurement
Study of the tools needed to measure and sell the value created by logistics throughout the supply chain. An evaluation of factors of complexity and their impact on the creation of this value. Physical valuation will be determined through the techniques of supply chain modeling and computer-based simulation. Financial valuation will be determined through activity-based cost accounting and capital budgeting techniques.
Instructor: Dr. Oliver Hedgepeth

ESM A694C Knowledge Management for Engineers
Study of analysis of the impacts of socio-contextual issues of computing technology for engineering management.
Instructor: Dr. Oliver Hedgepeth

CS A405 Artificial Intelligence
An introduction to the basic concepts of artificial intelligence. Topics include expert systems, natural language processing, machine learning and survey of AI programming languages with emphasis on LISP and PROLOG.
Instructor: Dr. Kenrick Mock

CS A450 Automata, Languages, and Computability
Study of the theory of computing. Topics include context-free grammars and parsing; finite automata and regular languages; pushdown automata and context-free grammars, deterministic and nondeterministic Turing machines; decidability and computability; complexity classes and complete problems.
Instructor: Dr. Kenrick Mock

PHYS/CHEM/BIOL A456 Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos
Offered every Fall semester
An introduction to nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Concrete examples from Physics, Biology, Chemistry, and Engineering are used to develop analytical methods and geometric intuition. Topics covered include phase plane analysis, interated maps, fractals and strange attractors. *Please note that you may also register for this course as BIOL A456 or CHEM A456. The option is yours, and perhaps the greatest decision will be deciding which prefix (Physics, Biology, or Chemistry) you would like to appear on your transcript. Course content and lecture times will remain unchanged regardless of which option you select.
Instructor: Dr. Jim Pantaleone

 

Alaska Pacific University

PH 301 Philosophy of Science at Alaska Pacific University
Study the practice, philosophy, and theory of science and its history as they pertain to the particular study of the development of the model of time in order to appreciate how the various aspects of science work together in the pursuit of knowledge. The class will attempt to elaborate on how the model of time that has emerged in the 20th century has facilitated the new sciences of Chaos Theory and Complexity Theory, as well as set the context for new battles about the Theory of Evolution.
Instructor: Dr. Mark Faller