Alaska Justice Forum 9(1), Spring 1992

Alaska Justice Forum 9(1), Spring 1992

"Parole Violators: A Glance" by Samuel H. Trivette

It's been suggested that many probabion and parole violators who have been returned to prison might be better served by other sanctions, thus relieving overcrowding in the Alaska prison system. This article analyzes the characteristics of 67 offenders who appeared before the Alaska Parole Board at parole revocation hearings during the summer of 1990. The data indicate that, while some violators could be diverted from returning to prison if intermediate sanctions were available, the numbers diverted would probably not be large.

"Prosecutors in State Courts, 1990 (A BJS Report)" by the Bureau of Justice Statistics

As of June 1990, approximately 2,300 chief prosecutors employed about 23,000 deputy attorneys for the prosecution of felony cases in state courts. This article presents findings from the National Prosecutor Survey Program (NPSP) conducted in 1990 by BJS, and compares them with findings from a similar national survey conducted in 1974. Based on the BJS report "Prosecutors in State Courts, 1990," NCJ-134500.

"Village Public Safety Officers: A Further Look" by Lawrence C. Trostle

The Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) program provides state funding for Alaska Native villages to hire their own public safety officers, who assist the Alaska State Troopers in handling public safety related problems. This article presents and compares data on enforcement vs. nonenforcement activities of Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs) statewide, in the Bethel region, and in the Bristol Bay region. The data indicate that VPSOs engage in a wide variety of public safety activities, many of which cannot be defined strictly as law enforcement activities.

"Language and Justice"

Phyllis Morrow, a cultural anthropologist at UAF, attorney Galen Paine, and legal interpreter Betty Harmun are conducting a study on the interaction between Yup'ik speakers and the American legal system and the impact upon case outcome of the almost exclusive use of English in the justice system, especially in the courts.

"1993–94 Judicial Fellows Program"

The Judicial Fellows Commission invites applications for the 1993–94 Judicial Fellows Program at the U.S. Supreme Court.