Victimization of Native Americans

Victimization of Native Americans

Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage. (Spring 2005). "Victimization of Native Americans." Alaska Justice Forum 22(1): 11. Based on a report from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, this article presents statistics showing that Alaska Natives and American Indians experience criminal victimization at twice the rate of the general U.S. population.

According to a statistical profile released by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) in late 2004, “American Indians and Crime,” Alaska Natives and American Indians are more likely than people of other races to be victims of violent crimes. From 1992 through 2002, this group experienced a per capita rate of violence twice that of the general U.S. resident population. This disparity in rates of exposure to violence occurred across age groups, by gender, and by location. In addition, Alaska Natives and American Indians were more likely than people of other races to experience violence from someone of another race, and the criminal victimizer was more likely to have consumed alcohol preceding the offense.

This article was derived from the Bureau of Justice Statistics report “American Indians and Crime: A BJS Statistical Profile, 1992-2002,” NCJ-203097. Copies of the entire report may be obtained from the Bureau of Justice Statistics web site at http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/aic02.htm.