Justice Center Publications & Media

Justice Center publications are available online at Scholarworks@UA, the University of Alaska's online institutional repository created to share research and works by UA faculty, students, and staff.

The Alaska Justice Forum and the Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center (AJSAC) Fact Sheet are online at Scholarworks@UA and are also available on our website.

For a list of publications by individual faculty or staff members, you can also go to the faculty/staff web page and click on individual names of authors.

Links to faculty and staff publications that have not yet been uploaded to Scholarworks@UA will be listed below as they are published.

Media

The Justice Center also produces videos of educational programs and presentations.  These are available on the Justice Center YouTube Channel. The video series, "Conversations about Landlord Tenant Law in Alaska," can be accessed on this page and on YouTube. 

Recent

Recent-write-up

AJiC Fact Sheet 18-01Value of Stolen Property Reported in Alaska, 1985–2016
AJiC Fact Sheet 17-03 (January)     [Download data]
Random Reamey

Presents data on the value of stolen property reported in Alaska from 1985 to 2016 as reported in the Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Overall, the 31-year trend reveals that the total value of stolen property in Alaska was relatively static with a trough beginning in 2008 and rising in 2014. The increase in stolen property value from 2014 to 2016 was mainly due to increases in the aggregate values of stolen motor vehicles and miscellaneous items.


(cover image)Alaska Justice Forum 34(3), Winter 2018

 

Publications

The Justice Center also produces videos of educational programs and presentations.  These are available on the Justice Center YouTube Channel. The video series, "Conversations about Landlord Tenant Law in Alaska," can be accessed on this page and on YouTube.

  • 2018
    AJiC Fact Sheet 18-01
    Value of Stolen Property Reported in Alaska, 1985–2016
    AJiC Fact Sheet 17-03 (January)     [Download data]
    Random Reamey

    Presents data on the value of stolen property reported in Alaska from 1985 to 2016 as reported in the Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Overall, the 31-year trend reveals that the total value of stolen property in Alaska was relatively static with a trough beginning in 2008 and rising in 2014. The increase in stolen property value from 2014 to 2016 was mainly due to increases in the aggregate values of stolen motor vehicles and miscellaneous items.


    (cover image)Alaska Justice Forum 34(3), Winter 2018

     

  • 2017
    AJiC Fact Sheet 17-03
    Motor Vehicle Theft Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015
    AJiC Fact Sheet 17-03 (Dec 2017)      [Download data]
    Random Reamey

    Presents data on motor vehicle theft arrests reported in Alaska from 1985 to 2016 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Overall, the motor vehicle arrest rate consistently declined between 1990 and 2014 when it reached the lowest level in the 1985–2016 period. The motor vehicle arrest rate rebounded in 2015 and 2016. Increases in Alaska motor vehicle arrest rates in 2015 and 2016 were particularly pronounced among adults and males, while motor vehicle arrest rates for juveniles and females remained minimal in comparison.


    Oral Vocabulary Training Program for Spanish Third-Graders with Low Socio-Economic StatusOral Vocabulary Training Program for Spanish Third-Graders with Low Socio-Economic Status: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    Journal article
    Clara Gomes-Koban, Ian Craig Simpson, Araceli Valle, and Sylvia Defior

    PLOS ONE 12(11): e0188157 (29 Nov 2017).

    Although the importance of vocabulary training in English speaking countries is well recognized and has been extnsively studied, the same is not true for Spanish–few evidence based vocabulary studies for Spanish-speaking children have been reported. Here, two rich oral vocabulary training programs (definition and context), based on literature about vocabulary instruction for English-speaking children, were developed and applied in a sample of 100 Spanish elementary school third-graders recruited from areas of predominantly low socio-economic status (SES). Compared to an alternative read-aloud method which served as the control, both explicit methods were more effective in teaching word meanings when assessed immediately after the intervention. Nevertheless, five months later, only the definition group continued to demonstrate significant vocabulary knowledge gains. The definition method was more effective in specifically teaching children word meanings and, more broadly, in helping children organize and express knowledge of words. We recommend the explicit and rich vocabulary instruction as a means to fostering vocabulary knowledge in low SES children.


    Crime Prevention and Community SafetyA Method of Identifying Dark-Time Crime Locations for Street Lighting Purposes
    Journal article
    Rustu Deryol and Troy C. Payne

    Crime Prevention and Community Safety (13 Nov 2017).

    Research on the effect of street lighting on crime and fear of crime has received much attention, especially between 1970s and early 2000s. Yet no study has documented an empirical method for choosing where to best site street lights for the purpose of crime prevention. This study describes a statistical clustering method (Kohonen’s SOM) that can be used to identify microplaces where crimes mostly occur during nighttime within stable crime hot spots. The results of this clustering analysis were visually examined and compared with streets, which are located near the University of Cincinnati West Campus and selected for lighting during early 2014. The findings revealed temporal patterns of crime within crime hot spots. In addition, there is a substantial overlap between the areas identified as heavily dark-time locations by clustering analysis and previously lighted streets determined by the city of Cincinnati managers. Implications of the study are discussed in conclusions.


    (cover image)Alaska Justice Forum 34(2), Fall 2017

    AJiC report
    Alaska Results First Initiative: Adult Criminal Justice Program Benefit Cost Analysis
    AJiC Report (Oct 2017)
    Araceli Valle

    The Alaska Results First Initiative, a new report from the Alaska Justice Informaton Center (AJiC) at the Justice Center, shows that most of Alaska's evidence-based adult criminal justice programs are showing positive return on state investment of money. Notably, all but one of those programs are shown to measurably reduce recidivism (the likelihood that an inmate will re-offend when released), which not only improves public safety, but saves the state the costs associated with criminal activity.


    Alaska Bar Rag 42(3), Jul–Sep 2017Federal Rules Complicate Growing Alaska Marijuana Business
    Journal article
    Jason Brandeis

    Alaska Bar Rag 42(3): 3 (Jul–Sep 2017).

    This article discusses the regulatory structure being put in place to guide Alaska's marijuana businesses, the continuing tension between state and federal laws on marijuana, and the challenges faced by marijuana businesses which, due to Alaska's limited road system, must ship by air or water, subject to federal regulations.


    Security JournalReducing Excessive Police Incidents: Do Notices to Owners Work?
    Journal article
    Troy C. Payne

    Security Journal 30(3): 922–939 (July 2017). 

    Many municipalities throughout the United States have enacted ordinances that allow cities to charge property owners fees or fines for excessive police calls for service to the property. However, there are few studies of the outcomes of such ordinances. This study examines the impact on the count of police incidents of a notice of potential future fees or fines to property owners in Anchorage, Alaska and Green Bay, Wisconsin. It was found that police incidents are reduced by 24–28 per cent after a notice of potential fines, with two-thirds of properties experiencing a decline in police incidents post-notice. The implications for policy and practice are discussed.


    (cover image)Alaska Justice Forum 34(1), Summer 2017

    [article image]The Anchorage, Alaska Municipal Pretrial Diversion Program: An Initial Assessment
    Journal article
    Cory R. Lepage and Jeff D. May

    Alaska Law Review 34(1): 1–26 (Jun 2017).

    Pretrial diversion programs have the potential to prevent future criminal behavior through intervention and community based services. This may be particularly true for specific populations of offenders such as those with mental illness, substance abuse disorder, and those with co-occuring disorders. Pretrial diversion programs take low-level offenders out of the jail population, both reducing system overpopulation and costs of incarceration. The programs also provide speedy case processing for minor crimes resulting in savings to the court system and personnel. Pretrial diversion can help an offender avoid a criminal conviction and potentially avoid future criminal violations. Results indicate that most Anchorage pretrial defendants comply with and complete the pretrial conditions in a very short time period, an additional savings in case processing time. This research details the initial assessment of the Anchorage Municipal Prosecutor Pretrial Diversion program. This assessment examines system savings in time and money, as well as policy implications for the justice system that may assist other jurisdictions as they consider implementing a pretrial diversion program.


    The Biggest Damned Hat: Tales from Alaska's Territorial Laywers and JudgesThe Biggest Damned Hat: Tales from Alaska's Territorial Lawyers and Judges
    Book
    Pamela Cravez

    Fairbanks, AK: University of Alaska Press, 2017.

    Built on interviews and oral histories from more than fifty lawyers who worked in Alaska before 1959, and buttressed by research into legal history, The Biggest Damned Hat offers a portrait of law in the territory from the gold rush to the 1950s — from laying the groundwork for strong civil and criminal law, to helping to secure mining and fishing rights, to the Alaska Court–Bar fight, which pitted Alaska’s community of lawyers against its nascent supreme court.


    AJSAC Fact Sheet 17-02Violent Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986-2015
    AJSAC Fact Sheet 17-02  (Feb 2017)    [Download data]
    Khristy Parker

    Presents data on violent crimes reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Violent crime" is an aggregate category that includes homicide (murder and non-negligent manslaughter), rape, robbery, and aggravated assault offenses reported to police. From 1986 to 2015, violent crime rates increased in Alaska although the overall crime rate decreased.


    Alaska Bar Rag 41(1), Jan–Mar 2017Status of Marijuana Law Confused by Election
    Journal article
    Jason Brandeis

    Alaska Bar Rag 41(1): 1, 22–23 (Jan–Mar 2017).

    This article examines different scenarios that may unfold regarding federal enforcement of marijuana laws following the 2016 U.S. presidential election, providing a look at how the “fragile truce” that has been established between the federal government and states that have legalized marijuana may or may not hold in the coming years.


    AJSAC Fact Sheet 17-01Property Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986-2015
    AJSAC Fact Sheet 17-01 (Jan 2017)     [Download data]
    Khristy Parker

    Presents data on property crime in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Property crime" is an aggregate category that includes burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft crimes. From 1986 to 2015 the property crime rate in Alaska decreased as the overall crime rate decreased. On average, property crime accounted for two-thirds of all crime in Alaska over the thirty-year period.


    Stalking Victimization in the Municipality of AnchorageStalking Victimization in the Municipality of Anchorage: Key Results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey
    Report (Jan 2017)
    André B. Rosay

    A two-page summary of key results on stalking victimization in the Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey.


    Stalking Victimization in the State of AlaskaStalking Victimization in the State of Alaska: Key Results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey
    Report (Jan 2017)
    André B. Rosay

    A two-page summary of key results on stalking victimization in Alaska statewide from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey.


    Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect
    Prevalence Estimates and Correlates of Elder Abuse in the United States: The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey
    Journal article
    André B. Rosay and Carrie F. Mulford

    Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect 29(1): 1–14 (2017).

    This study examines the prevalence and correlates of psychological abuse and physical abuse against women and men aged 70 or older. Self-report data from 2,185 respondents in the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) were used to create weighted estimates for past-year experiences of abuse. Correlates were then examined using survey logistic regression models. More than 1 in 10 adults who are 70 years of age or older (14.0%) have experienced some form of abuse in the past year, with 12.1% experiencing psychological abuse and 1.7% experiencing physical abuse. One in five victims (20.8%) were abused by both intimate and nonintimate partners. Health care insecurity was the strongest correlate of past-year abuse. The odds of experiencing abuse were 4.53 times greater for those who experienced health care insecurity than for those who did not. This presents a significant challenge for identifying and helping victims of abuse.

  • 2016
    AJSAC Report
    Alaska Sex Offender Recidivism and Case Processing Study: Final Report
    AJSAC Report (Dec 2016)
    Brad A. Myrstol, Marny Rivera, & Khristy Parker

    This report provides updated estimates of Alaska sex offender recidivism, expanding the post-inarceration follow-up period from two years (as used in previous studies) to seven years in order to better understand sex offender desistance from crime; and analyzes data on individuals arrested at least once for the commission of one or more registerable sex offenses from 2008 to 2011 to evaluate the accuracy and completeness of Alaska’s criminal history repository data on sex offenses and to explore the quality of those data for examining case processing of misdemeanor and felony offenses.


    (cover image)Alaska Justice Forum 33(2–3), Summer/Fall 2016

    AJSAC Fact Sheet 16-06
    Homicide in Alaska, 1986-2015
    AJSAC Fact Sheet 16-06 (Nov 2016; revised 2/1/17)     
    [Download data]
    Khristy Parker

    Presents data reported on homicides (murders and nonnegligent manslaughters) in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Over the 30-year period from 1986 to 2015, homicide rates decreased in Alaska overall, but increased in the Municipality of Anchorage. The Fact Sheet also presents data on the most commonly used weapons in homicides, victim-offender relationships, and clearance rates for homicides.


    AJSAC Fact Sheet 16-05
    Sexual Violence Committed Against University of Alaska Students, by Gender
    AJSAC Fact Sheet 16-05 (Oct 2016)
    Lindsey Blumenstein & Brad Myrstol

    Presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students both on and off campus. Women- and men-specific estimates are provided for the UA system as a whole only. The results presented here are based on the survey responses of a randomly selected sample of 1,982 undergraduate and graduate students who were enrolled at any of the three UA major administrative units (MAUs) — UA Anchorage (UAA), UA Fairbanks (UAF), or UA Southeast (UAS) during spring semester 2016 This survey was modeled on the Campus Climate Survey Recommendations prepared by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault.


    [report cover]The Anchorage, Alaska Municipal Pretrial Diversion Program: Initial Outcome Assessment
    Report (Sep 2016)
    Cory R. Lepage and Jeff D. May

    This report provides an initial outcome assessment  of the Anchorage Municipal Pretrial Diversion Program, a voluntary program aimed at diverting first-time offenders in certain criminal and traffic cases from traditional case processing, with successful complion of the terms of the program resulting in dismissal of charges. Pretrial diversion agreements under AMC 08.05.060 typically require the defendant to pay a fine or do community work service, usually within a month. The initial assessment examines offender completion under the program, adherence to conditions of probation, and time and cost savings for the Anchorage Municipal Prosecutor's Office.


    [image of cover:] NIJ Journal 277Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men
    Journal article
    André B. Rosay

    NIJ Journal 277: 38–45 (Sep 2016). NCJ 249822.

    More than four in five American Indian and Alaska Native women and men have experienced violence in their lifetime, and more than one in three experienced violence in the past year, according to a new report from an NIJ-funded study. The study, part of NIJ's research program on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women, looked at how prevalent psychological aggression and physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and sexual violence were among American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. It also examined the perpetrators' race and the impact of the violence.


    Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence in the Municipality of AnchorageIntimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence in the Municipality of Anchorage: Key Results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey
    Report (Aug 2015)
    André B. Rosay

    This document is a two-page summary of the key results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey for the Municipality of Anchorage and trends from 2010–2011 to 2015. A handout from the Powerpoint slide presentation is also available.


    Alaska Bar Rag 40(3), Jul–Sep 2016Marijuana Legalization: It's About to Get Real
    Journal article
    Jason Brandeis

    Alaska Bar Rag 40(3): 1, 3 (Jul-Sep 2016)

    This article summarizes recent developments in Alaska as the Alaska Marijuana Control Board (MCB) begins to approve marijuan retail stores and issuse preliminary licenses to marijuana cultivatio facilities and testing labs in Alaska.


    AJSAC Fact Sheet 16-04
    Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Assault Committed Against University of Alaska Students
    AJSAC Fact Sheet 16-04 (Jun 2016; revised 10/20/16)
    Lindsey Blumenstein & Brad Myrstol

    Presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students. Estimates are provided for the UA system as a whole, as well as for each of UA's three major administrative units (MAUs): the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA), the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), and the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS). This survey was modeled on the Campus Climate Survey Recommendations prepared by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault.


    [image of report cover]Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey
    Report

    André B. Rosay

    Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, May 2016. NCJ 249736.

    This report examines the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men, using a large nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). More specifically, it provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations and briefly examines the impact of violence. Results should be used to raise awareness and understanding about violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men.


    AJSAC Fact Sheet 16-03
    Alaska Trauma Registry: Trauma Admissions Involving Firearms, 2009–2014 
    AJSAC  Fact Sheet 16-03 (Apr 2016)
    Khristy Parker

    Presents data on the characteristics of trauma admissions resulting from the use of a firearm in Alaska for the period 2009 through 2014.


    (cover image)Alaska Justice Forum 33(1), Spring 2016

    Criminology, Criminal Justice, Law & SocietyThe Importance of Small Units of Aggregation: Trajectories of Crime at Addresses in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1998–2012
    Journal article
    Troy C. Payne and Kathleen Gallagher

    Criminology, Criminal Justice, Law & Society 17(1): 20–36 (Apr 2016).

    We describe the temporal and spatial patterns of crime at unique addresses over a 15-year period, 1998–2012, in a medium-sized Midwestern city.  Group-based trajectory analysis of police incidents recorded by the Cincinnati Police Department are combined with geographic analysis for the entire city, while also highlighting individual address points in one high-crime neighborhood.  We find that six trajectories adequately describe the city-wide data, with the low-stable crime trajectory comprising the majority of the places, while the high-stable crime trajectory is just 2.5% of addresses yet consistently has one-third of crime, which accounts for a disproportionate amount of crime.  Similar to previous research at the street-block level, small differences in city-wide trends from 1998–2012 obscure large differences within trajectories.  Places with very different trajectories of crime are very often located on the same street segment.  Nearly all high-crime addresses exist among a cloud of low-crime places.  This suggests that characteristics of individual addresses are of importance both to crime theory and crime prevention practice.


    nternational Criminal Justice ReviewThe Complexity of Problem-Solving in Urban Parks: A Case Study
    Journal article
    Troy C. Payne and Daniel Reinhard

    International Criminal Justice Review 26(2): 134–149 (Jun 2016).

    Urban parks present difficult environments in which to analyze crime and disorder problems. We describe data collection and analysis of a limited evaluation of an intervention meant to reduce crime and disorder in an urban park through increasing park use. The case study uses an urban park in the municipality of Anchorage, AK. The research method took into account differing activity spaces within the small (one-city block) park by dividing the park into a dozen distinct zones based on the built environment and how people used the space. Consistent with prior research, we found that increasing park usage decreased crime and disorder and that disorder was associated with a lack of natural surveillance. Moreover, research shows urban parks are frequently the site used by many groups—parks are contested space.


    (cover image)Alaska Justice Forum 32(4), Winter 2016

    Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence in the State of AlaskaIntimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence in the State of Alaska: Key Results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey
    Report (Feb 2016)
    André B. Rosay

    This document is a two-page summary of the key results from the 2015 Alaska Victimization Survey for Alaska statewide and trends from 2010 to 2015, which show a decline in intimate partner and sexual violence in Alaska since 2010. A handout from the Powerpoint slide presentation is also available.


    AJSAC Fact Sheet 16-02

    Juvenile Justice Referrals and Charges in Alaska, FY 2006-2015
    AJSAC  Fact Sheet 16-02 (Feb 2016)
    Khristy Parker

    Presents data on the number of referrals and charges, and unique individuals referred to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) during FY 2006–2015.


    Alaska Bar Rag 40(1), Jan–Mar 2016Marijuana Legalization: Read before You Grow, Sell, Toke
    Journal article
    Jason Brandeis

    Alaska Bar Rag 40(1): 1, 5 (Jan–Mar 2016).

    This article provides an overview of regulations developed to implement and govern Alaska's commercial marijuana industry as authorized by the November 2014 passage of a ballot measure to legalize recreational cannabis in Alaska. The regulations codified at 3 AAC 206, which became effective February 21, 2016, establish rules for growing, processing, and testing marijuana plants and products, as well as parameters for the licensing and operation of marijuana businesses.


    AJSAC Fact Sheet 16-01
    Alaska Trauma Registry: Trauma Admissions Involving Alcohol or Illegal Drugs, 2014
    AJSAC  Fact Sheet 16-01 (Jan 2016)
    Khristy Parker

    Presents data on trauma admissions to Alaska hospitals in 2014. The Fact Sheet focuses on demographics of patients with trauma admissions, as well as the number of trauma admissions involving alcohol or illegal drugs.

     

 

Media

The Justice Center also produces videos of educational programs and presentations.  These are available on the Justice Center YouTube Channel. The video series, "Conversations about Landlord Tenant Law in Alaska," can be accessed on this page and on YouTube.

  • 2018
     
  • 2017

    "The Importance of 'Time' in Analysis" (streaming video) by Brad A. Myrstol. Interpreting Crime Statistics: The Basics. (3:55 mins.). Anchorage, AK: Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017. (https://youtu.be/x2KQTuqA-BI).

    This is the first in a series of short videos to help everyday people interpret basic crime statistics. In this video, data on rates of larceny theft in Alaska for 1985–2016 are used to demonstrate the importance of time in analyzing whether crime is trending upward, trending downward, or remaining flat. If we use short timeframes (one year, five years), we would conclude that larceny theft rates in Alaska have gone up. But if we use longer timeframes — 10 years all the up to 30 years — our conclusions change: larceny theft crime in Alaska has actually decreased over over the 30-year period from 1985 to 2016. Using longer timeframes, we see that cime rates fluctuate up and down over time, and we're also able to make more accurate judgments of long-term trends. If our timeframe is too short, we run the risk of reaching faulty conclusions about crime trends.

    Produced and edited by Eric Baldwin, UAA Academic Innovations and eLearning.


    "Elder Abuse: More Than 1 in 9 Alaskan Women 60+ Experienced Abuse in the Past Year" (streaming video) by André B. Rosay and L. Diane Casto. (4:21 mins.). Anchorage, AK: Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017. (https://youtu.be/DT5KdyOmNJE).

    Dr. Andre Rosay, director of the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage, presents findings from the Alaska Victimization Survey with L. Diane Casto, executive director of the Alaska Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDVSA), which funds the Alaska Victimization Survey. Results show that 11.5% or 1 in 9 Alaskan women aged 60 and older experienced psychological or physical abuse in the past year.

    produced and edited by Eric Baldwin, UAA Academic Innovations and eLearning.


    "What Does It Take? Ending Domestic & Sexual Violence in Alaska" (video) by Lindsey Blumenstein, Wendi Siebold, and Carmen Lowery. Lunch & Learn. 51:06 mins. (program starts at 10:30). Juneau, AK: 360 North, 2017. (http://www.360north.org/gavel/video/?clientID=2147483647&eventID=2017021312&eventID=2017021312&startStreamAt=630).

     

  • 2016

    "Conversations About Landlord Tenant Law in Alaska" (streaming video) by Ryan Fortson and Daniel Coons (2016).

     "The Fairbanks 4: Lessons Learned from Alaska's First Exoneration" (streaming video) by William B. Oberly, Richard Allen, Lesley Hammer, and Troy C. Payne (2016).