Coronavirus information

In response to the COVID-19 global pandemic, the University of Alaska Anchorage has taken steps to protect the health and safety of our campus community. Visit the University of Alaska Coronavirus Information website to learn how UAA and the university system are responding to this situation. Find links to communications, policy guidance, resources and information about the university's community restrictions, which apply to all faculty, staff and students. The UAA Student Health and Counseling Center remains open at this time to serve UAA students. For information about COVID-19 symptoms and current health recommendations, visit the CDC website and the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services.


Medical Office Coding, OEC

Overview

The UAA Medical Office Coding program prepares students to work as medical office coders in medical office and outpatient settings coding medical records for statistical and reimbursement purposes. The program is based upon the American Academy of Professional coders (AAPC) recommendations.  We offer a 17-credit undergraduate Occupational Endorsement Certificate (OEC) that is typically completed over three academic semesters of part-time coursework.  

Upon successful completion of the program, students are prepared to sit for the AAPC’s Certified Professional Coder (CPC) examination. Students who successfully pass the AAPC's Certified Professional Coder (CPC) examination will be granted initial apprenticeship status. See more regarding CPC-A apprenticeship status

Program Highlights

  • 17 credit Occupational Endorsement Certificate
  • Fall, Spring and Summer Semester start options
  • Certificate is typically completed in three semesters of half-time enrollment.
  • Some courses offered in an online learning format.
  • Courses prepare students to take the AAPC Professional Coder (CPC) exam

 

What is a coder?

Medical office coders work in medical offices and outpatient settings coding medical records for statistical and reimbursement purposes. A good understanding of medical terminology is essential for diagnosis and procedure coding. An understanding of human biology or anatomy and physiology is also necessary for a medical coder to accurately interpret what one is attempting to code.