Early Alerts

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Every semester, the Office of Student Success requests that faculty fill out two Progress Reports on their students, as part of our campus-wide early alerts program through Navigate. Research tells us that universities with particularly successful programs have two things in common:

  • Targeted student populations for early intervention
  • Clearly defined intervention plans for early alerts that are raised on students

As we know from institutional data, UAA’s Progress Report Campaigns have been effective at improving student academic outcomes. For example, compared to the entire population of first year students, first year students with faculty alerts and intrusive staff outreach have higher increases in average credit completion, cumulative, and term GPAs.

To assist our advisors with how to best advise their students, we provide faculty a list of alert reasons to choose from, with the option to provide more details to give our advisors more context for working with their students. In an effort to help our advisors manage their caseloads, and to help our students take ownership of their education, our less urgent alerts directly notify the student, providing a list of resources available to them, along with a reminder that their professor is their best resource.


Progress Report Campaigns

The focus of our first Progress Report Campaign is primarily to identify students who are starting the semester off with not attending class.

Checking in with these students and providing crucial guidance from their advisors or the Office of Student Success can help students recognize when they may need help creating a strategy to be successful, or if their life or work circumstances have changed since registration, drop the course before it is too late so they can be more successful in a different semester.

Alert Reasons for Progress Report Campaign No. 1:

Student Notified Directly

  • Low Scores on Assignments or Tests - Referral for Tutoring
  • Engaged but Missing some Assignments or Tests
  • No Concerns - The Student is Engaged and Performing Well!

Case Opened (for OSS Review and Advisor Outreach)

  • Not Attending Class or Engagement Issues 
  • Non-Academic Concerns 

 The focus of our second Progress Report Campaign is to identify students who are most at risk of failing the course, and should consider withdrawing from the course, before they receive a failing grade.

 Alert Reasons for Progress Report Campaign No. 2:

Student Notified Directly

  • Low Scores on Assignments or Tests - Referral for Tutoring
  • Engaged but Missing some Assignments or Tests
  • Not Attending Class or Engagement Issues 
  • No Concerns - The Student is Engaged and Performing Well!

Case Opened (for OSS Review and Advisor Outreach)

  • Enrollment Action Recommended
  • Non-Academic Concerns 

 

Alert Selection Instructions

No Concerns - The Student is Engaged and Performing Well! 

  • The student is regularly attending class and doing well on assignments and exams, and you want to encourage them to do well.

Low Scores on Assignments or Tests - Referral for Tutoring

  • The student is engaging with course materials, but is academically struggling to keep up, and grades are not good. The student would benefit from seeking tutoring assistance.

Engaged but Missing some Assignments or Tests

  • The student is often attending class but has not turned in major assignments or has missed major exams, which is significantly impacting their grade.

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Not Attending Class or Engagement Issues 

  • The student rarely or never shows up to class, and should receive outreach from their academic advsior or the OSS as follow up.

Enrollment Action Recommended

  • The student is currently failing the class, and they should talk with their academic advisor to consider withdrawing from the class.

Non-Academic Concerns 

  • If the student brings up they are struggling with issues related to family life, mental health, emotional support, financial concerns, employment concerns, or any other issue not related to the classroom.