Field School

The anthropology department offers field schools and overseas study trips in most years. Archaeological field schools, which can be taken for variable credit, occur during the summer session and typically last four to six weeks. Previous and ongoing field sites include excavations at the Broken Mammoth site, and prehistoric and contact period sites in the Aleutians and south-central Alaska. 

Yakutat Field School, 2014

June 15 - July 9, July 10 - August 8 

Join the University of Alaska Anchorage archaeological field school at Yakutat Bay, Alaska, with Dr. Aron Crowell (Smithsonian Institution), now open for limited undergraduate and graduate enrollment for Summer 2014 (ANTH 431/631). Site surveys and excavations will focus on the history of Eyak and Tlingit settlement and seal hunting around Yakutat Bay since A.D. 1100, with instruction in field techniques and Southeast Alaskan cultures. Wilderness camping and small boat travel required. Two 3 1/2 week sections are offered (June 15 - July 9 and July 10 - Aug. 8). Lab fee includes return air travel from Anchorage to Yakutat. Instructor permission is required for enrollment, so start by sending your CV to Aron Crowell at crowella@si.edu.

 

Course listings and online registration are at https://uaonline.alaska.edu/. If not already enrolled at UAA, UAF, or UAS you must first register as a non-degree seeking student through http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/admissions/requirements/on_line_application_instructions_nds.cfm. On Facebook at Smithsonian Yakutat Seal Camps Project.

Aron Field School

 

PAST FIELD SCHOOLS

Yakutat Bay, Summer 2013

Yakutat UAA field schoolUniversity of Alaska Anchorage archaeological field school at Yakutat Bay, Alaska, with Dr. Aron Crowell (Smithsonian Institution). Included site surveys and excavations that focused on the history of Eyak and Tlingit settlement and seal hunting around Yakutat Bay since A.D. 1100, with instruction in field techniques and Southeast Alaskan cultures. Wilderness camping and small boat travel required.



Adak, Aleutian Islands, Summer 2011

AdakContinuing the multi-year surveying and recording of archaeological sites on Adak Island. Work during the 2011 season continued surveying the western part of the island, and focused on the archaeological excavation of an inland habitation site identified the previous year. Contact Dr. Diane Hanson at afdkh@uaa.alaska.edu or 907-786-6842 for more information.

Follow the Central Aleutians Upland Archaeology Project on Facebook!

 

Broken Mammoth, Summer 2010

mammothThe Broken Mammoth site is one of the oldest archaeological sites in Beringia and North America, and contains stone tools, bone and mammoth ivory tools, and well-preserved faunal remains from a variety of species: bison, wapiti, caribou, moose, small game, and birds, including a variety of waterfowl. Summer 2010 excavations at  Broken Mammoth focused on recovery of stone tools and faunal remains from late Pleistocene/early Holocene levels at the site, as well as testing the Younger Dryas sediments for possible evidence of an asteroid impact affecting human settlement.



Adak, Aleutian Islands, Summer 2010

Adak

Surveying and excavation of inland sites on Adak Island, located approximately in the center of the 1,000 mile long Aleutian chain. Work in 2010 focused on documenting the Caribou Peninsula positioned on the west side of Adak. In addition to surveying areas for upland sites, which have seen comparatively little attention by archaeologists, the 2010 field school conducted test excavations at sites located during a 2007 survey to recover information about settlement patterning. Click on the photo to be directed to the Central Aleutians Upland Archaeological Survey website.