Graduate Degrees



 

Civil Engineering

The Master of Science in Civil Engineering (MSCE) is designed for students who wish to pursue research-oriented occupations or to eventually pursue a PhD degree, as well as to prepare for advanced professional engineering practice. The Master of Civil Engineering (MCE) is designed for students who wish to further emphasize engineering practice and prefer to substitute additional classroom education for graduate research experience.


Applied Environmental Science and Technology

The graduate program in Applied Environmental Science and Technology (AEST) is designed for students seeking careers as environmental professionals in the academic, regulatory, industrial, military or consulting sectors. The program is interdisciplinary in nature and encourages candidates to develop an understanding of environmental principles through advanced studies across biology, chemistry, geology, statistics, applied environmental science and technology, and environmental engineering. This program offers two degree options and one graduate certificate option.

 

Arctic Engineering

The Arctic Engineering program is designed to provide graduate education for engineers who must deal with the unique challenge of design, construction and operations in the cold regions of the world. The special problems created by the climactic, geological and logistical conditions of the Arctic and sub-Arctic require knowledge and techniques not usually covered in the normal engineering courses.

Development of petroleum and other natural resources has accentuated the demand for engineers trained in northern operations, both from private industries involved in development and government agencies planning or regulating these activities. Of primary importance is a thorough knowledge of heat transfer processes and properties of frozen ground and frozen water, which are basic to most engineering activities in the Arctic. The areas of hydraulics, hydrology, materials and utility operations are also uniquely affected by Arctic considerations.