The culinary arts program produces graduates who are not just prepared for entry-level work positions in the rapidly expanding and varied foodservice, hospitality and tourism industry, but also graduates who can quickly advance in career opportunities because of their formal training and education.

Program Overview

The culinary arts program provides essential training in the ever-expanding food service industry. Hospitality and tourism are two of the world's leading industries, and are the largest retail employers in the U.S. with annual expenditures of more than $2 trillion dollars. The number of people employed by this industry in the U.S. alone currently totals more than 12.5 million people. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts this figure to rise to 14.4 million by 2016.

The industry’s employment base, which includes significant numbers of women and minorities, is the largest of any industry in the private sector. Trained culinarians are continually needed in both the hospitality and tourism industries. Career possibilities available to graduates of the culinary arts program include positions in restaurants, clubs, bakeries, hotels, and institutions. Management jobs are also available to graduates. In some segments, such as contract food service and quick service restaurants, need for entry-level management is acute, due to continued growth. Management positions in many food service organizations offer high salaries and excellent advancement opportunities.

The associate of applied science degree requires two years to complete. This program offers a general culinary core with emphasis on development of food preparation, baking skills, cost control, operations and management. Food service workers who wish to update their skills and knowledge may enroll in courses for which they qualify.

Since 2006 there has been a transfer agreement for culinary arts majors to study abroad in Italy for one semester at Apicius, the Culinary Institute of Florence. Students will be able to apply credits earned in Florence towards their UAA culinary arts degree.

 

What Our Alumni Are Saying ...

"It’s very important to have a clear goal in mind and to talk about it and to visualize it and let everybody else know around you what you want. I would get up in every journalism class and say I wanted to be a food writer. And one day I happened to be in a reporting class sitting next to the then-editor of the Anchorage Daily News’s ‘Play’ magazine. He heard me say that and asked if I wanted to write for his Cheap Eats section."

-Riza (Parsons) Brown
A.A. Culinary Arts ’10
B.A. Journalism and Public Communications ’12

Read Riza's profile.