Realtime Communication Access

Disability Support Services arranges for American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreters, TypeWell Transcribers, CART providers and Assistive Technology such as FM Listening Systems and equipment for displaying captioned video.

 To arrange for realtime communication access services or to address any questions or concerns,contact the DSS Staff Interpreter/Coordinator Anne Lazenby at 907-786-4545 or email amlazenby@uaa.alaska.edu

 

American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreters

Students using American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreters are encouraged to make their request to DSS with as much advance notice as possible to facilitate scheduling.  You can make your request for classes by logging into the DSS system. For other events, please use the ASL Interpreter Request Form.

 

TypeWell, C-Print and CART

TypeWell or C-Print Transcribing

Trained transcribers use laptop computers and sophisticated abbreviation software to provide realtime communication access for students who experience hearing loss.

Students using Transcribers are encouraged to make their request to DSS with as much advance notice as possible to facilitate scheduling.

Information about TypeWell can be found online at http://www.typewell.com

Information about C-Print can be found online at http://www.ntid.rit.edu/cprint/.

Communications Access Realtime Translation (CART)

A specially trained CART provider uses a stenotype machine with a phonetic keyboard and special software. A computer translates the phonetic symbols into English captions almost instantaneously. The slight delay is based on the captioner's need to hear the word and computer processing time. Students using CART are encouraged to make their request to DSS with as much advance notice as possible to facilitate scheduling. 

 

Assistive Listening Technology

DSS has Assistive Listening Devices that can be checked out by students to use on a semester by semester first come first served basis. These devices are used to amplify the professors voice. Some of these systems use a microphone that is placed on a desk or table to pick up sounds from the classroom while other systems have the instructor or professor wear a wireless microphone. Some systems use headphones while others transmit the amplified sounds directly to hearing aids.

Sometimes students also ask for recorders so that class lectures can be played back at a louder volume after class. Other times students ask that an optical overhead be used so that documents being read out loud in the classroom can be simultaneously viewed on screen.

If you have questions about these Assistive Technologies please contact DSS.