Standard 6 COE Accreditation/Self-Study Report Home Overview Conceptual Framework Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 5 Standard 6 Exhibits
 

6e. Unit Resources Including Technology

6e.1. How does the unit allocate resources across programs to ensure candidates meet standards in their field of study?

COE revenues come from 3 sources: general fund (53%), tuition (34%), and candidate fees (13%). Revenues generated from tuition are part of an 80/20 revenue sharing system, with COE retaining 80% of tuition generated from courses. Tuition revenues, and revenues from candidate fees vary with enrollment and credits. Candidate fee revenues are directed back to the appropriate departments and used on expenditures that relate directly to candidates.

Personnel costs account for 93% of COE’s budget. The remaining 7% is allocated to travel, contractual services, and commodities. Department chairs and directors receive a non-personnel budget each fiscal year and have discretion on how those monies are spent.

COE participates in UAA’s annual operating budget allocation process. This process was developed and is reviewed and revised by the Planning and Budget Advisory Council (PBAC). The budget development process is managed by the UAA Office of Budget and Finance. The Dean and Fiscal Manager participate in PBAC on behalf of the college. The process begins with the base budget from the previous fiscal year. Colleges use the process to advocate for increased funding and must demonstrate a need for additional funds.

After budget allocations are completed through PBAC, the Dean and Fiscal Manager work with department chairs and directors to adjust budgets. While the previous year’s budget is used as a guide for distribution of the current year’s budgets, reallocation of faculty lines may occur within COE at the time of faculty retirements, at the elimination of low enrollment programs, or when faculty leave for other reasons. The Dean may also encourage the growth of a particular program by reallocating a vacant faculty line. This usually occurs when compelling data are provided through program reviews or when enrollments warrant it.

Other funding sources include foundation and grant funds. Foundation funds are generally unrestricted and used at the discretion of the Dean for expenses such as promoting candidate success, purchasing equipment and supplies, and supporting travel and salaries. COE grant funds are restricted. The Alaska Educational Innovations Network grant provides match funding for personnel in addition to funding its main purpose of building stronger teaching and learning communities within and across Alaska schools and districts. The Rural Alaska Principal Preparation and Support grant provides tuition support for principal candidates.

6e.2. What information technology resources support faculty and candidates? What evidence shows that candidates and faculty use these resources?

UAA has extensive information technology resources for both faculty and candidates. Information Technology (IT) Services supports faculty via the Faculty Technology Center, AV Services (equipment, training, video/audio conferencing), Telephone Services, and Computer Services (computer labs, desktop services, software). Information technology resources for candidates include an online course evaluation tutorial, Blackboard instructions, eLive set up, distance education information, assistive technology, adaptive computer workstations, and other technology resources. An IT Services Call Center supports both faculty and candidates.

COE is committed to offering courses and programs via distance. Both faculty and candidates use desktop resources including Blackboard and eLive extensively. In the spring of 2009, 62% of COE’s courses were offered by distance technologies. All full-time faculty have participated in one or more technology-based professional development opportunity offered by AEIN or UAA. AEIN opportunities range from short Blackboard and eLive training sessions to week-long sessions. For example, from August 2008 through January 2009, AEIN offered 14 training sessions, provided eLive class support 9 times, and met with individual faculty 33 times. UAA opportunities include those offered through the Faculty Technology Center and CAFÉ in which many COE faculty participate. In 2008-09, 14 full-time and 8 adjunct faculty used the online Moodle-based faculty development resources, 12 faculty and 13 courses used media production services (media conversion, equipment loan, and support for streamed media), 13 faculty used instructional design services (Blackboard, Second Life, and eLive support; instructional design consulting/research; and smart classroom training), and 3 faculty participated in the Technology Fellows Program.

All courses, both distance and face-to-face, have a Blackboard shell. Most faculty use Blackboard to enhance face-to-face instruction and all candidate course evaluations are completed via Blackboard. COE also has digital cameras and camcorders for faculty and candidate use. Candidates, particularly those in initial teacher programs, use these for class projects. From AY07 to AY09, candidate exit survey agreement with regard to their program’s capability to help them develop an understanding of and ability to use educational technology in instruction improved from 61% to 86%.

6e.3. What resources are available for the development and implementation of the unit's assessment system?

The COE Assessment and Accreditation Committee, a standing committee of the College, committed to provide leadership in the development and implementation of an assessment system over 5 years ago. This evolving assessment system supports accreditation and reporting requirements from various entities including UAA, Alaska Department of Education and Early Development (Title II), SPAs, and accrediting bodies such as NWCCU and NCATE. Financial resources from the UAA Office of Academic Affairs have supported efforts for the past 5 years. These resources are primarily used to support programs as faculty define program goals and measures of success and integrate state, national, and institutional standards into UAA’s required assessment reporting. In 2005 COE hired a full-time Data Manager whose work in setting up PETaL and coordinating and supplementing the College data and reporting needs with the University’s Banner system has been invaluable. COE also adopted TaskStream as the repository for standards-based assessments, including key assessments, and other data. TaskStream accounts are provided to all faculty; candidates purchase subscriptions.

All faculty have been involved to various degrees in developing and implementing COE’s assessment system. Faculty workloads over the last 5 years reflect the College’s commitment to support such activities as chairing the COE Assessment and Accreditation Committee, developing assessment plans for programs, developing standards-based assessments, writing SPA reports, and contributing to the UAA Outcomes Assessment reports. Numerous College workday sessions have included assessment topics or have been totally devoted to assessment matters. In 2008-09 COE allocated funds to hire an NCATE consultant who spent considerable time advising the College regarding the assessment system. The Assessment and Accreditation Committee is a standing committee of the College and the Assessment Handbook is a product of their work.

6e.4. What library and curricular resources exist at the institution? How does the unit ensure they are sufficient and current?

The Consortium Library (Std6e.Exh16) is the second largest research library in the state of Alaska. In 1971, Alaska Methodist University (now Alaska Pacific University, or APU) and UAA entered into an agreement that established the library. In 2004, APU and UAA celebrated the completion of a 4-year, $43 million construction project that includes a 3-story parking garage, a new 120,000 square foot addition, and the renovation of the existing library building. The new library boasts the latest networking and wireless technology, space for individual and group study, meeting rooms, a multimedia room, and the world’s northernmost Foucault pendulum. The library shares its space with the Alaska Resources Library and Information Services (ARLIS), the Alaska Moving Image Preservation Association (AMIPA), the Justice Center, the Faculty Technology Center, the Center for Advancing Faculty Excellence, the Center for Community Engagement and Learning, and a general-use computer lab. On the roof of the library is a “beacon of knowledge,” a 60-foot LED display welcoming inquiring minds to the library.

The library has more than 834,300 volumes onsite. It licenses for UAA (including the community campuses) more than 230 databases and 50,000 electronic books and journals, which can be accessed via the Internet or at the library. In addition to its general collection, the library houses archives of photographs and personal papers; organizational records relating to Alaska history; a specialized collection of health and medical resources and publications; and a large collection of popular movies, educational films, and classical and jazz music. The library is a designated select federal and state depository library.

Librarians regularly interact with faculty by serving as departmental subject liaisons to coordinate reference/research assistance, library instruction programs, and collection development. Faculty members from all programs and departments are encouraged to submit recommendations for library materials to their liaisons. Each library liaison has a funding allocation for the purchase of materials. Faculty members new to the University are offered a special one-time library allocation for the purchase of materials needed for their teaching and research.

The Library Advisory Committee advises and assists the dean of the library and the library faculty and staff on issues and concerns. The Committee also assists with testing and evaluating new databases, websites, and library related software under consideration for purchase or implementation. This past year, the Library commissioned the LibQUAL survey, which is a highly respected tool for soliciting, tracking, and understanding library users’ opinions of the Library’s services and collections. The Library is using the survey results in its planning and budgeting process to set priorities for the next few years.

6e.5. How does the unit ensure the accessibility of resources to candidates, including candidates in off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, through electronic means?

The Consortium Library is open nearly 100 per week during the fall and spring semesters. The library is available for an adequate number of hours during the week, on weekends, and during intersessions. Other than the library’s archival collections, all library materials are available during all hours that the library is open. During exam week, the library remains open until 2AM. With the opening of the new library facility, visits to the library have increased by 19%, with nearly 1,000 more people entering the building during an average semester week. Reference librarians are available in person or by phone during most of the hours the library is open, and will respond to e-mail questions or instant messaging from the library’s website.

Candidates and faculty have access to more than 230 electronic databases, linking to more than 50,000 e-journals and e-books, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and have web access to WorldCat, the largest online library catalog in the world, listing more than 144 million titles. From WorldCat, candidates and faculty can generate interlibrary loan requests for titles not held in the Consortium Library.

The library web page highlights the specific library services designed to help candidates succeed at UAA. The library also coordinates an online tutoring program for introductory college courses as part of the Statewide Library Electronic Doorway (SLED) program. In 2009, the Library started using LibGuides, a versatile 2.0 tool. With LibGuides, the library can explore new ways for collaborating with faculty, communicating with candidates, and delivering library instruction. The library also provides an electronic document delivery service where candidates, staff, and faculty can request articles from the library’s print collections. The requested articles are scanned and sent electronically at no charge. About 3,200 requests were filled in FY09.

Optional

1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 6?

COE, community campus, and CAS faculty, as well as educators in AEIN network schools, have had extraordinary opportunities for professional development related to culturally responsive teaching, rural/urban exchanges, school reform, and distance education through the AEIN grant. These interactions have developed a uniquely cohesive unit. The chart below provides a snapshot of the array of experiences.

Professional Development Supported by AEIN


Year

Meetings/Work Groups
# of Events
(Total # of Participants)

Conferences

# of Events
(Total # of
Participants)

Symposia

# of Events
(Total # of Participants)

Study Groups

# of Events
(Total # of Participants)

Site Visitations
# of Events
(Total # of Participants)

2006

6
(75)

Participants from

  • COE
  • P-12 Rural Schools
  • P-12 Urban Schools
  • CAS
  • ISER
  • Kenai College
  • Kodiak College

9
(38)

Participants from

  • COE
  • Kenai College
  • P-12 Urban Schools
  • P-12 Rural Schools

 

10
(160)

Participants from

  • Kodiak College
  • Kenai College
  • Mat-Su College
  • COE
  • EED
  • P-12 Urban Schools

8
(52)

Participants from

  • COE
  • Kenai College

6
(21)

Participants from

  • COE
  • P-12 Rural Schools

2007

7
(152)

Participants from

  • Kodiak College
  • COE
  • Mat-Su College
  • Kenai College
  • CAS
  • P-12 Urban Schools
  • P-12 Rural Schools
  • ISER

7
(30)

Participants from

  • COE
  • Kodiak College
  • CAS
  • Community Partners
  • Kenai College
  • P-12 Rural Schools

 

5
(123)

Participants from

  • P-12 Urban Schools
  • P-12 Rural Schools
  • COE
  • EED
  • Community Partners
  • Kenai College

1
(6)

Participants from

  • COE

9
(34)

Participants from

  • COE
  • P-12 Rural Schools
  • CAS
  • P-12 Urban Schools

2008

2
(43)

Participants from

  • COE
  • ISER

4
(15)

Participants from

  • COE
  • ISER
  • P-12 Schools

 

 

1
(2)

Participants from

  • COE
  • CAS

2009

3
(25)

Participants from

  • COE
  • ISER

6
(38)

Participants from

  • COE
  • ISER
  • P-12 Schools

 

 

5
(6)

Participants from

  • COE
  • CAS

CAS – College of Arts and Sciences
EED – Alaska Department of Education and Early Development
ISER – Institute of Social and Economic Research