University of Alaska Anchorage

  • Building Alaska's Future

    Apprenticeship Programs provide students with quality training to meet industry specifications, increase workforce productivity, enhance retention and develop future leadership.

    Learn More About Apprenticeship Programs


Apprenticeship Programs

Apprenticeship strengthens the economy by helping businesses meet the demand for skilled workers while offering higher wages and better employment outcomes.

By providing an alternative career path to traditional degree seeking students, we are preparing Alaska’s workforce to meet the growing demands for qualified technicians, and earn a livable wage early in their career.

UAA’s Community and Technical College (CTC) is expanding Apprenticeship in Alaska by collaborating with industry partners to create sustainable programs.  Our goal is to assist industry partners by providing a well-trained and highly skilled local workforce, reducing the expenditures involved with recruitment and turnover.

  • Apprenticeship has real and tangible benefits.
  • Apprenticeship benefits industry, community, and individuals.
  • Apprenticeship is a time tested model for training skilled and qualified journeyworkers.

Current Apprenticeship Program

Automotive Technologies

UAA is partnering with  Continental Motors to offer registered apprenticeships for automotive technicians.

Apprentices receive technical training as well as college credits from our automotive technologies department, while gaining the job training and work experience from Continental Motors.

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Apprenticeship is Good for Business

  • Good Work Habits

    Training Apprentices insures that they perform to your expectations and learn your methodology and practices.  Previously trained workers demand higher wages, and may have work habits that are not consistent with your standards and are less productive.

  • Local Talent

    Training local people increases the chance that they will remain in the community increasing the pool of skilled workers and making local business less reliant on a transient or seasonal workforce.

  • Loyalty

    Apprentices who work for and are trained by a single company are more inclined to remain with the employer lowering rate of turnover and the cost of recruitment and increasing the retention of skilled workers.

  • Good Business

    The Center for American Progress reports that 98 percent of sponsors recommend registered Apprenticeship Programs.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor91% of apprentices continue employment with the sponsor after the conclusion of their apprenticeship program.


Roles and Responsibilities 

  • Apprentice
    • Read and sign the apprenticeship standards.
    • Abide by the terms of the Apprenticeship agreement.
    • Work all hours required and perform job related duties to the employers satisfaction.
    • Attend all related training and complete required coursework with a satisfactory grade.
    •  Maintain regular contact with employer and sponsor representatives.
    •  Adhere to the policies of the University and the employer.

  • University of Alaska Anchorage
    • Designate a Point of Contact (POC) who will work with journey workers/apprentices to help them prepare applications to receive nontraditional transfer credit.
    • Coordinate with the Alaska USDOL Office of Apprenticeships to register the program with the State Apprenticeship Agency or with the Federal Office of Apprenticeships.
    • Identify existing curriculum that would effectively crosswalk to an apprenticeship model.
    • Develop curriculum for job related instruction, when necessary.
    • Award credit for learning and related instruction acquired in the apprenticeship at levels as controlled by University of Alaska Board of Regents Policy and UAA Nontraditional Credit Policy.  These are informed by and align with recommendations or requirements of the American Council on Education (ACE) Guide, the National College Credit Recommendation Service (NCCRS) and the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU). 
    • Deliver job related instruction to apprentices, when necessary.
    • Standardize curriculum reviews for job related instruction.
  • Training Providers / Sponsors (Employers)
    • Hire and sponsor new workers, or sponsor current employees to be apprentices.
    • Identify an experienced mentor to work with apprentices.
    • Pay progressively higher wages as skills increase.
    • Provide structured OJT in-house, when appropriate.

  • Alaska DOLWD and the USDOL Alaska Office of Apprenticeships
    • Provide technical assistance and support to UAA.
    • Answer questions about the apprenticeship model.
    • Guide the partners through the steps to develop and register a program.
    • Connect employers with university programs.
    • Advise partners on sources of funding to support apprenticeships. 

 

Contact Us

Bill Blanas
Apprenticeship Coordinator
Phone: 907-786-6478 
Email: vblanas@alaska.edu

Leesa Arnes
Administrative Specialist
Phone: 907-786-6495
Email: lmarnes@alaska.edu

 

Mailing Address:
UAA Community and Technical College
3211 Providence Drive, UC 141
Anchorage, AK 99508

Physical Address:
University Center 141
3901 Old Seward Hwy.
Anchorage, AK 99503