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University of Alaska Anchorage

  • Apprenticeship...An Alternative Career Path

    Apprenticeship Programs are a blend of full-time employment and related technical instruction. These programs are an earn while you learn alternative to a traditional college education and is highly effective for training skilled workers and BUILDING ALASKA WORKFORCE.

    Learn More About Apprenticeship Programs

  • Facts 

     The Average Loan Amount for Undergraduates at University of Alaska Anchorage is $6,723 per year. Borrowing the average amount will result in loans of $13,446 after 2 years and $26,892 after 4 years.  Starting on your career path with a large debt load is not the only option.  UAA Cost of Attendance

    Apprentices have access to federal funding that traditional students are not eligible for. This funding is available to all federally registered apprentices regardless of their social or economic status. The Workforce Investment Opportunities Act (WIOA) pays toward books, tuition, parking, and tools and can even be used for transportation, child care and other services.

     By sponsoring apprenticeship programs UAA is providing an alternative career path to traditional degree seeking students. This Blended training approach prepares apprentices to become skilled and qualified technicians and earn a livable wage early in their career.

    What are the benefits?

    • Apprentices earn wages from full time employment and attend college part time taking an average of 7 credits per semester. 
    • Journey worker Automotive and Diesel mechanics earn an average of $27 to $32.00 per hour in Alaska.
    • First year Apprentices make 60% of journey worker wages or $16.20 to $19.20 per hour depending on the occupation.
    • Apprentices work 2,000 hours per year while attending an average of 2 classes per semester.
    • Apprentices are guaranteed a 10% raise each year they successfully complete coursework and work requirements.
    • Apprentices completing the program receive a nationally recognized Journey Worker credential from the Department of Labor, and 49-52 college credits towards an
      Associate of Applied Science degree in Automotive Technology or Diesel Power Technology.

     

    Apprenticeship Application


    Apprenticeship is Good for Business

    • Good Work Habits

      Training Apprentices insures that they perform to your expectations and learn your methodology and practices.  Previously trained workers demand higher wages, and may have work habits that are not consistent with your standards and are less productive.

    • Local Talent

      Training local people increases the chance that they will remain in the community increasing the pool of skilled workers and making local business less reliant on a transient or seasonal workforce.

    • Loyalty

      Apprentices who work for and are trained by a single company are more inclined to remain with the employer lowering rate of turnover and the cost of recruitment and increasing the retention of skilled workers.

    • Good Business

      The Center for American Progress reports that 98 percent of sponsors recommend registered Apprenticeship Programs.

    According to the U.S. Department of Labor91% of apprentices continue employment with the sponsor after the conclusion of their apprenticeship program.


    Roles and Responsibilities 

    • Apprentice
      • Read and sign the apprenticeship standards.
      • Abide by the terms of the Apprenticeship agreement.
      • Work all hours required and perform job related duties to the employers satisfaction.
      • Attend all related training and complete required coursework with a satisfactory grade.
      •  Maintain regular contact with employer and sponsor representatives.
      •  Adhere to the policies of the University and the employer.

    • UAA
      • Designate a Point of Contact (POC) who will work with journey workers/apprentices to help them prepare applications to receive nontraditional transfer credit.
      • Coordinate with the Alaska USDOL Office of Apprenticeships to register the program with the State Apprenticeship Agency or with the Federal Office of Apprenticeships.
      • Identify existing curriculum that would effectively crosswalk to an apprenticeship model.
      • Develop curriculum for job related instruction, when necessary.
      • Award credit for learning and related instruction acquired in the apprenticeship at levels as controlled by University of Alaska Board of Regents Policy and UAA Nontraditional Credit Policy.  These are informed by and align with recommendations or requirements of the American Council on Education (ACE) Guide, the National College Credit Recommendation Service (NCCRS) and the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU). 
      • Deliver job related instruction to apprentices, when necessary.
      • Standardize curriculum reviews for job related instruction.
    • Training Providers / Sponsors (Employers)
      • Hire and sponsor new workers, or sponsor current employees to be apprentices.
      • Identify an experienced mentor to work with apprentices.
      • Pay progressively higher wages as skills increase.
      • Provide structured OJT in-house, when appropriate.

    • Alaska DOLWD and the USDOL Alaska Office of Apprenticeships
      • Provide technical assistance and support to UAA.
      • Answer questions about the apprenticeship model.
      • Guide the partners through the steps to develop and register a program.
      • Connect employers with university programs.
      • Advise partners on sources of funding to support apprenticeships. 

     


Current Apprenticeship Programs

UAA's Community and Technical College (CTC) has partnered with local businesses to offer registered apprenticeships for Automotive and Diesel mechanics.

 

 

Contact Us

Bill Blanas
Apprenticeship Coordinator
Phone: 907-786-6478 
Email: vblanas@alaska.edu

Leesa Arnes
Administrative Specialist
Phone: 907-786-6495
Email: lmarnes@alaska.edu

 

Mailing Address:
UAA Community and Technical College
3211 Providence Drive, SSB 214
Anchorage, AK 99508

Physical Address:
Social Sciences Building, Suite 214
3211 Providence Drive
Anchorage, AK 99508