UA 2021 Drug-Free Schools Notification

In accordance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 and to promote healthy lifestyles and prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by all students and employees, the University of Alaska presents the following information about health risks associated with drug and alcohol use; counseling and treatment resources; University policies and sanctions; and federal, state, and local law and legal sanctions.

Health Risks Associated With Substance Abuse

Alcohol

Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses of alcohol also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including spouse and child abuse. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely affecting a person's ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce these effects.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life threatening. Long term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver.

Women who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and intellectual disabilities. In addition, research indicates that children of parents with alcohol addiction are at a greater risk than others of developing an alcohol addiction.

From page 62 of “What Works: Schools Without Drugs” published by the US Department of Education

Drugs

Drug use can have a wide range of short-term, long-term, direct, and indirect effects. Short-term effects can range from changes in appetite, wakefulness, heart rate, blood pressure, and/or mood to heart attack, stroke, psychosis, overdose, and even death. These health effects may occur after just one use.

Longer-term effects can include heart or lung disease, cancer, mental illness, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, and other diseases. Long-term drug use can also lead to addiction. Drug addiction is a brain disorder. Not everyone who uses drugs will become addicted, but for some, drug use can change how certain brain circuits work. These brain changes interfere with how people experience normal pleasures in life and can make it much more difficult for someone to stop taking the drug even when it's having negative effects on their life and they want to quit.

Drug use can also have indirect effects on both the people who are taking drugs and on those around them. This can include affecting a person's nutrition; sleep; decision-making and impulsivity; and risk for trauma, violence, injury, and communicable diseases. Drug use can also affect babies born to women who use drugs while pregnant. Broader negative outcomes may be seen in education level, employment, housing, relationships, and criminal justice involvement.

From National Institute on Drug Abuse. Health consequences of drug misuse.

Drugs of Abuse/Uses and Effects

Narcotics

Table of Drug Abuse, Uses and Effects for Narcotics
Drugs CSA Schedules Trade or Other Names Medical Uses Dependence: Physical Dependence: Psychological Dependence: Tolerance Usual Method Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Heroin Substance I Diamorphine, Horse, Smack, Black tar, Chiva, Negra (black tar) None in U.S., Analgesic,Antitussive High High Yes Injected, snorted, smoked Euphoria, drowsiness, respiratory depression, constricted pupils, nausea Slow and shallow breathing, clammy skin, convulsions, coma, possible death Watery eyes, runny nose, yawning, loss of appetite, irritability, tremors, panic, cramps, nausea, chills and sweating
Morphine Substance II MS-Contin, Roxanol, Oramorph SR, MSIR Analgesic High High Yes Oral, injected
Hydrocodone Substance II, Product III, V Hydrocodone w/ Acetaminophen, Vicodin, Vicoprofen, Tussionex, Lortab Analgesic, Antitussive High High Yes Oral
Hydromophone SubstanceII Dilaudid Analgesic High High Yes Oral, injected
Oxycodone Substance II Roxicet, Oxycodone w/ Acetaminophen, OxyContin, Endocet, Percocet, Percodan Analgesic High High yes Oral
Codein Substance II, Product III, V Acetaminophen, Guaifenesin or Promethazine w/Codeine, Fiorinal, Fioricet or Tylenol w/Codeine Analgesic, Antitussive Moderate Moderate Yes Oral, injected
Other Narcotics Substance II, III, IV Fentanyl, Demerol, Methadone, Darvon, Stadol, Talwin, Paregoric, Buprenex Analgesic, Antidiarrheal, Antitussive High-Low High-Low Yes Oral, injected, snorted, smoked

Depressants

Table of Drug Abuse, Uses and Effects for Narcotics
Drugs CSA Schedules Trade or Other Names Medical Uses Dependence: Physical Dependence: Psychological Dependence: Tolerance Usual Method Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
gamma-Hydroxybutyric Acid Substance I, Product III GHB, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid X, Sodium, Oxybate, Xyrem None in U.S., Anesthetic Moderate Moderate Yes Oral Slurred speech, disorientation, drunken behavior without odor of alcohol, impaired memory of events, interacts with alcohol Shallow respiration, clammy skin, dilated pupils, weak and rapid pulse, coma, possible death Anxiety, insomnia, tremors, delirium, convulsions, possible death
Benzodiazepines Substance IV Valium, Xanax, Halcion, Ativan, Restoril, Rohypnol (Roofies, R-2), Klonopin Antianxiety, Sedative,Anti-convulsant, Hypnotic, Muscle Relaxant Moderate Moderate Yes Oral, injected
Other Depressants Substance I, II, III, IV Ambien, Sonata, Meprobamate, Chloral Hydrate, Barbiturates, Methaqualone (Quaalude) Antianxiety, Sedative, Hypnotic Moderate Moderate Yes Oral

Stimulants

Table of Drug Abuse, Uses and Effects for Narcotics
Drugs CSA Schedules Trade or Other Names Medical Uses Dependence: Physical Dependence: Psychological Dependence: Tolerance Usual Method Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Cocaine Substance II Coke, Flake, Snow, Crack, Coca, Blanca, Perico, Nieve, Soda Local anesthetic Possible High Yes Snorted, smoked, injected Increased alertness, excitation, euphoria, increased pulse rate and blood pressure, insomnia, loss of appetite Agitation, increased body temperature, hallucinations, convulsions, possible death Apathy, long periods of sleep, irritability, depression, disorientation
Amphetamine/Meth-amphetamine Substance II Crank, Ice, Cristal, Krystal Meth, Speed, Adderall, Dexedrine, Desoxyn Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, narcolepsy, weight control Possible High Yes Oral, injected, smoked
Methylphenidate Substance II Ritalin (Illy's), Concerta, Focalin, Metadate Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder Possible High Yes Oral, injected, snorted, smoked
Other Stimulants Substance III, IV Adipex P, Ionamin, Prelu-2, Didrex, Provigil Vaso-constriction Possible Moderate Yes Oral

Hallucinogens

Table of Drug Abuse, Uses and Effects for Narcotics
Drugs CSA Schedules Trade or Other Names Medical Uses Dependence: Physical Dependence: Psychological Dependence: Tolerance Usual Method Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
MDMA and Analogs Substance I (Ecstasy, XTC, Adam), MDA (Love Drug), MDEA (Eve), MBDB None None Moderate Yes Oral, snorted, smoked Heightened senses, teeth grinding and dehydration Increased body temperature, electrolyte imbalance, cardiac arrest Muscle aches, drowsiness, depression, acne
LSD Substance I Acid, Microdot, Sunshine, Boomers None None Unknown Yes Oral Illusions and hallucinations, altered perception of time and distance (LSD) Longer, more intense "trip" episodes None
Phencyclidine and Analogs Substance I, II, III PCP, Angel Dust, Hog, Loveboat, Ketamine (Special K), PCE, PCPy, TCP Anesthetic (Ketamine) Possible High Yes Smoked, oral, injected, snorted Unable to direct movement, feel pain, or remember Drug seeking behavior Not regulated
Other Hallucinogens Substance I Psilocybe mushrooms, Mescaline, Peyote Cactus, Ayahausca, DMT, Dextro-methorphan (DXM) None None None Possible Oral

Cannabis

Table of Drug Abuse, Uses and Effects for Narcotics
Drugs CSA Schedules Trade or Other Names Medical Uses Dependence: Physical Dependence: Psychological Dependence: Tolerance Usual Method Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Marijuana Substance I Pot, Grass, Sinsemilla, Blunts, Mota, Yerba, Grifa None Unknown Moderate Yes Smoked, oral Euphoria, relaxed inhibitions, increased appetite, disorientation Fatigue, paranoia, possible psychosis Occasional reports of insomnia, hyperactivity, decreased appetite
Tetrahydro-cannabinol Substance I, Product III THC, Marinol Antinauseant, Appetite stimulant Yes Moderate Yes Smoked, oral
Hashish and Hashish Oil Substance I Hash, Hash oil None Unknown Moderate Yes Smoked, oral

Anabolic Steroids

Table of Drug Abuse, Uses and Effects for Narcotics
Drugs CSA Schedules Trade or Other Names Medical Uses Dependence: Physical Dependence: Psychological Dependence: Tolerance Usual Method Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Testosterone Substance III Depo Testosterone, Sustanon, Sten, Cypt Hypogonadism Unknown Unknown Unknown Injected Virilization, edema, testicular atrophy, gynecomastia, acne, aggressive behavior Unknown Possible depression
Other Anabolic Steroids Substance III Parabolan, Winstrol, Equipose, Anadrol, Dianabol, Primabolin-Depo, D-Ball Anemia, Breast cancer Unknown Yes Unknown Oral, injected

Inhalants

Table of Drug Abuse, Uses and Effects for Narcotics
Drugs CSA Schedules Trade or Other Names Medical Uses Dependence: Physical Dependence: Psychological Dependence: Tolerance Usual Method Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Amyl and Butyl Nitrite   Pearls, Poppers, Rush, Locker Room Angina (Amyl) Unknown Unknown No Inhaled Flushing, hypotension, headache Methemoglobinemia Agitation
Nitrous Oxide   Laughing gas, balloons, whippets Anesthetic Unknown Low No Inhaled Impaired memory, slurred speech, drunken behavior, slow onset vitamin deficiency, organ damage Vomiting, respiratory depression, loss of consciousness, possible death Trembling, anxiety, insomnia, vitamin deficiency, confusion, hallucinations, convulsions
Other Inhalants   Adhesives, spray paint, hairspray, dry cleaning fluid, spot remover, lighter fluid None Unknown High No Inhaled

Alcohol

Table of Drug Abuse, Uses and Effects for Narcotics
Drugs CSA Schedules Trade or Other Names Medical Uses Dependence: Physical Dependence: Psychological Dependence: Tolerance Usual Method Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Alcohol   Beer, wine, liquor None High High Yes Oral Impaired memory, slurred speech, drunken behavior, slow onset vitamin deficiency, organ damage Vomiting, respiratory depression, loss of consciousness, possible death Trembling, anxiety, insomnia, vitamin deficiency, confusion, hallucinations, convulsions

Drug and Alcohol Counseling and Treatment

Students

The University of Alaska Anchorage offers numerous health education seminars, workshops, and events, and students are encouraged to participate. Additionally, personal counseling is available on the Anchorage and Kenai River campuses. Call for telehealth availability.

Employees

Employees experiencing substance abuse-related issues are strongly encouraged to seek confidential counseling services.

The Deer Oaks Employee Assistance Program is a free service provided for employees and their dependents and it offers a wide variety of counseling, referral, and consultation services that are completely confidential. The program can be accessed by contacting Deer Oaks directly at 1-888-9937650 or online at www.deeroakseap.com. The University of Alaska employee health insurance program contains benefits for some in-patient and out-patient treatment.

Local Drug and Alcohol Resources

An * indicates resources that are available to students only.

Anchorage

Homer Area

Kenai Area

Kodiak

Matanuska-Susitna Area

Prince William Sound Area

Copper Basin
Cordova
Valdez

Other Virtual Resources

Standards of Conduct for Students and Employees

Students

The University of Alaska Board of Regents have established a set of rights and responsibilities, The Student Code of Conduct (the Code), that students attending at any of the UA campuses are expected to abide by. The Code for all universities can be found in the University of Alaska Board of Regents' Policy and University Regulation.

Applicable sections of the Code include:

Violations of the Code, that occur on property, owned or controlled by the University, or at activities authorized by the University, are subject to University student conduct review and disciplinary action by the University. The Student Code of Conduct may also apply to behavior that occurs off campus. See P09.02.030.B.

The University may initiate disciplinary action and impose sanctions on any student or student organization found responsible for committing, attempting to commit, or intentionally assisting in the commission of prohibited conduct. See P09.02.020.C.

Misuse of Alcohol

Misuse of alcohol includes but is not limited to:

  • use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of alcoholic beverages in violation of local, state or federal law, Regents' Policy, University Regulation, or MAU rules and procedures; or
  • engaging in any other category of prohibited conduct while under the influence of alcohol may constitute a violation of this category. See R09.02.020(14).

Misuse of Drugs or Other Intoxicants

Misuse of drugs or other intoxicants includes but is not limited to:

  • use, possession, manufacture, distribution, or being under the influence of illegal drugs or other controlled substances in violation of local, state or federal law, Regents' Policy, University Regulation or MAU rules and procedures;
  • abuse or misuse of prescription or over-the-counter medications, other chemical substances or other intoxicants;
  • engaging in any other category of prohibited conduct while under the influence of legal drugs or other intoxicants may constitute a violation of this category; or
  • use, possession, manufacture, distribution, or being under the influence of designer drugs. See R09.02.020(15).

Employees

The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession or use by an employee of a controlled substance is prohibited in any workplace of the University. Further, the use of any legally obtained drug, including alcohol, to the point where such use adversely affects the employee's job performance, is prohibited. An employee must notify the University within five days of any conviction for criminal drug statute violations occurring on-or off University premises while conducting University business. University Board of Regents' Policy and Regulations, P04.02.040 and P04.02.050, provide for a University Drug-Free Workplace; and Employee Alcohol and Controlled Substance Testing for certain employees.

Disciplinary Procedures and Sanctions for Students and Employees

Students

Students found responsible for misuse of alcohol or other intoxicants or drugs will have disciplinary sanctions imposed. Additionally, student conduct violating federal, state, or local laws may be referred for prosecution. In determining appropriate University sanctions, a student’s present and past disciplinary record, the nature of the offense, the severity of any damage, injury, or harm resulting from the prohibited behavior, and other factors relevant to the matter will be considered. The following list of sanctions is an illustrative rather than exhaustive list of disciplinary measures that may be taken by Residence Life staff, the Dean of Students Office, the Chancellor, and designated community campus personnel. The University reserves the right to create other reasonable sanctions or combine sanctions as it deems appropriate. Sanctions include:

  1. Warning - A written notice that the student is violating or has violated the Code, and that further misconduct may result in more severe disciplinary action.
  2. Probation - A written warning that includes the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to be violating the Code during a specified probationary period.
  3. Denial of Benefits - Specific benefits may be denied a student for a designated period of time.
  4. Restitution - A student may be required to reimburse the University or other victims related to the misconduct for damage to or misappropriation of property, or for reasonable expenses incurred.
  5. Discretionary Sanction - Discretionary sanctions include community service work or other uncompensated labor, educational classes, research papers, reflective essays, counseling, or other sanctions that may be seen as appropriate to the circumstances of a given matter. Costs incurred by the student in fulfilling a discretionary sanction will be the responsibility of the student.
  6. Restricted Access - A student may be restricted from entering certain designated areas and/or facilities or from using specific equipment for a specified period of time.
  7. Suspension - The separation of the student from the University for a specified period of time, after which the student may be eligible to return. During the period of suspension, the student may be prohibited from participation in any activity authorized by the University and may be barred from all property owned or controlled by the University.
  8. Expulsion - Expulsion is considered to be the permanent separation of the student from the University. The student may be prohibited from participation in any activity authorized by the University and may be barred from property owned or controlled by the University.
  9. Group Sanctions - Student groups or organizations found to have violated provisions of the Code may be put on probation or sanctioned, which may include loss of University-related benefits and access to University facilities and University-held funds.

Employees

Violation of standards of conduct will result in disciplinary action. Sanctions may include, but are not limited to, the following actions which may be taken in any order as deemed appropriate by the University:

  1. Verbal or written reprimand
  2. Suspension of work with or without pay
  3. A period of provisional employment
  4. Termination for cause
  5. Referral for prosecution
  6. Required participation in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program
  7. Follow up testing may be done if appropriate See R04.02.040, R04.02.050.

Alcohol: Federal Laws, State Laws, and Campus Policy

The University of Alaska Anchorage prohibits the misuse of alcohol and enforces state and federal alcohol rules on campus.  Individuals who violate this policy are subject to university disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion of students and termination of employment, as well as local, state, and federal legal penalties. For the UAA Alcohol Policy, Residence Life Alcohol Policy, and the policy for University Authorized Travel, please visit https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/students/alcohol-drugs-wellness/policies.cshtml.

Alaska law provides:

  • Furnishing alcohol to persons under 21 can have serious consequences ranging from conviction for a class A misdemeanor, with up to a year in jail and a $25,000 fine, to a felony conviction, up to five years’ jail time, and up to a $50,000 fine.
  • Possessing, controlling, or consuming alcohol while under 21 years old can result in a fine of $500.
  • A person under 21 who enters licensed premises can result in a fine of $500.
  • A person under the age of 21 who asks another person to purchase alcohol may be convicted of a class A misdemeanor, with up to a year in jail and a $25,000 fine, and also be responsible for a $1500 penalty.
  • Illegal sales and distribution of alcohol can result in a penalty including fines up to $10,000 and up to one year of jail time.
  • Operating a motor vehicle, aircraft, or watercraft while under the influence of an alcoholic beverage, inhalant, or controlled substance (DUI) can result in multiple penalties: 1) jail time ranging from 3 days to 5 years; 2) fines from $1,500 – $50,000, 2) loss of driver’s license, 3) required ignition interlock devices, and 4) substance abuse treatment. DUI is a misdemeanor for a first offense and a felony for subsequent offenses.

Drugs: Federal Laws, State Laws, and Campus Policy

The University of Alaska prohibits the possession of marijuana and other controlled substances anywhere on university property. Violation of this policy can result in disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion and termination of employment, as well as local, state, and federal penalties.

The possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs is prohibited by federal and state law. Strict penalties are enforced for drug convictions, including mandatory prison terms for many offenses.

For more information on federal drug laws, please visit the Drug Enforcement Agency website using the following links: DEA Controlled Substances ActDEA Drug Scheduling.

The misuse of prescription medication, including giving or sharing medication with another person is unlawful distribution of a controlled substance. Penalties can include jail time and serious fines.

Marijuana: Federal Laws, State Laws, and Campus Policy

The University of Alaska Anchorage is a federally funded institution and therefore must comply with federal law. Therefore, no person may possess, consume, cultivate, or be perceptively under the influence of marijuana on university property or at university sanctioned events.  Violation of this policy can result in disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion and termination of employment, as well as local, state, and federal penalties.

Marijuana is federally classified as a schedule I drug; possession, consumption, cultivation, and sale of it can result in penalties including imprisonment and serious fines. For more information regarding federal drug trafficking penalties, please visit the Drug Enforcement Agency website.

Current Alaska state laws provide:

  • Marijuana can be legally possessed by individuals over 21 years of age in the state of Alaska. However, it is unlawful for any person to publicly consume marijuana and can result in a $100 penalty.
  • Marijuana may not be possessed used, displayed, purchased, or transported by any person under 21; violators face a Class B Misdemeanor and up to a $1,000 fine.
  • No person over 21 shall be in possession of or in the process of growing more than 6 plants, or a household of individuals 21 or over possessing, or processing more than 12 plants; violation can result in up to a $750 penalty.
  • Cultivation of plants must occur in a place where they are not subject to public view and must be reasonably secured from unauthorized access; violation can result in a $750 penalty.
  • It is unlawful for persons under 21 to manufacture, possess, purchase, or distribute marijuana accessories. Doing so can result in a violation

 For more information on current marijuana laws in Alaska, please visit https://www.commerce.alaska.gov/web/amco/marijuanaregulations.aspx.

Please note that although Alaska state law allows individuals over the age of 21 to possess and consume marijuana, it is still prohibited on all UAA property and at UAA activities, and violators face serious university sanctions.

Local Municipal Laws

Applicable local alcohol and drug laws and ordinances are in accordance with state statutes but may be subject to change with the passage and implementation of possible new laws. Local laws and ordinances for the following locations may be found online:

Denial of Federal Aid (20 USC 1091)

Under the Higher Education Act of 1998, students convicted under federal or state law for the sale or possession of drugs may have their federal financial aid eligibility suspended. This includes all federal grants, loans, federal work study programs, and more. Students convicted of drug possession will be ineligible for one year from the date of the conviction of the first offense, two years for the second offense, and indefinitely for the third offense. Students convicted of selling drugs will be ineligible for two years from the date of the first conviction, and indefinitely for the second offense. Those who lose eligibility may regain eligibility by successfully completing an approved drug rehabilitation program.

UAA Amnesty Policy

This policy provides amnesty from minor policy violations, such as the misuse of alcohol, to students who may be hesitant to report student misconduct, such as sexual assault. This policy provides amnesty to individuals who help others in need, students who ask for help with addictive behaviors, and individuals who bring serious crimes to the University’s attention. To review the full amnesty policy, please refer to BOR Policy and Regulations 09.02.