Weather Closure

University of Alaska Anchorage campus will be closed September 24, 2021 beginning at 6:40 AM, due to weather. Students and employees should check their email for more information. The university will remain closed for the weekend and reopen on Monday morning.

The Alaska Airlines Center will be open Saturday, September 25, for the home volleyball match that afternoon.

Other Prohibited Discrimination

Submit a Report

Reports to the Office of Equity and Compliance can be made in person, via phone, email, or online by submitting an incident report. When a report is made, our staff will reach out to the Complainant and provide the resources and information necessary to ensure safety and support. A Formal Investigation will only be initiated with consent of the Complainant or when the University believes necessary. 

UAA Discrimination and Harassment Incident Report

Nondiscrimination Statement

The University of Alaska is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution.  The University of Alaska does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, citizenship, age, sex, physical or mental disability, status as a protected veteran, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, parenthood, sexual orientation, gender identity, political affiliation or belief, genetic information, or other legally protected status. The University's commitment to nondiscrimination, including against sex discrimination, applies to students, employees, and applicants for admission and employment. Contact information, applicable laws, and complaint procedures are included on UA's statement of nondiscrimination available at www.alaska.edu/ nondiscrimination.

Information regarding University of Alaska's nondiscrimination policy can be found in BOR Policy 01.02

Information regarding University of Alaska's sex and gender-based discrimination policy can be found in BOR Policy 01.04

Protected Categories

A protected category/class is a group of people who qualify for certain special protection under a law or policy. For example, the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is one anti-discrimination law that protects certain groups of people (i.e. under this Act people are protected from discrimination based on race, religion, color, sex and national origin). Under this Act, and other federal anti-discrimination laws (like the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act), a person may not be discriminated against based on certain characteristics. Everyone has protection of these state and federal anti-discrimination laws.

State Law, Federal Law, and University of Alaska policy set forth criteria under which one is prohibited from being discriminated against or harassing another individual on the basis of (but not limited to):

  • Race / Ethnicity

    Race and/or Ethnicity discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee or student unfavorably because that person is of a particular race/ethnicity or because the individual displays personal characteristics associated with a particular race or ethnicity (such as hair texture, skin Ethnicity, or certain facial features).

    Race or Ethnicity discrimination also can involve treating someone unfavorably because the person is married to (or associated with) a person of a certain race or ethnicity.

    Discrimination can also occur between two people of the same race or ethnicity, as in, when the target of the discrimination and the person who is discriminating is of the same race or ethnicity.

  • Religion

    Religious discrimination involves treating people (applicants, students or employees) unfavorably because of their religious beliefs. 

    Religious discrimination can also involve treating someone differently because they are married to or associated with an individual of a particular religion.

    Religious accommodations are not currently handled by the Office of Equity and Compliance. The Office of Equity and Compliance only Investigates claims of harassment/discrimination based on religion. 

  • Color

    Color discrimination involves treating someone unfavorably because of skin color complexion as in the hue of the skin.

    Color discrimination also can involve treating someone unfavorably because the person is married to (or associated with) a person of a certain color.

    Discrimination can also occur between two people of the same color, as in, when the target of the discrimination and the person who is discriminating are of the same or color.

  • National Origin

    National origin discrimination involves treating people (applicants, students or employees) unfavorably because they are from a particular country or part of the world, because of ethnicity or accent, or because they appear to be of a certain ethnic background (even if they are not).

    National origin discrimination also can involve treating people unfavorably because they are married to (or associated with) a person of a certain national origin.

    Discrimination can occur when the target and the person who inflicted the discrimination are of the same national origin.

  • Citizenship
    Citizenship discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee, or student unfavorably based on their citizenship or immigration status. 
  • Age
    Age discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee or student less favorably because of their age. 
  • Sex / Gender

    Sex (Gender) discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee, or student unfavorably because of that person's sex (gender).

    Both the target and the harasser can be either a woman or a man, and the target and harasser can be the same sex (gender).

    Men and women in the same workplace should be given equal pay for equal work. The jobs need not be identical, but they must be substantially equal. Job content (not job titles) determines whether jobs are substantially equal. All forms of pay are covered by this law, including salary, overtime pay, bonuses, stock options, profit sharing and bonus plans, life insurance, vacation and holiday pay, gasoline allowances, hotel accommodations, reimbursement for travel expenses, and benefits.

  • Disability

    Disability discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee or student less favorably because that person is a qualified individual with a disability.

    Disability discrimination also occurs when an individual treats an applicant, employee or student less favorably because they have a history of a disability (such as cancer that is controlled or in remission) or because she is believed to have a physical or mental impairment that is not transitory (lasting or expected to last six months or less) and minor (even if she does not have such an impairment).

    Federal law and UAA Policy requires that the University provide a reasonable accommodation to an employee, job applicant, or student who is a qualified individual with a disability unless doing so would cause significant difficulty or expense to the University ("undue hardship").

    A reasonable accommodation is any change in the work or academic environment (i.e. in the way things are usually done) to help a person with a disability apply for a job, perform the duties of a job, enjoy the benefits and privileges of employment or perform as a student.

    Reasonable accommodations might include, for example, making the workplace accessible for wheelchair users or providing a reader or interpreter for someone who is blind or hearing impaired.

  • Veteran Status
    Veteran Status discrimination occurs anytime being a veteran and former uniformed military service member makes you a target of workplace or educational prejudice or discrimination. 
  • Marital Status
    Marital Status discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee or student less favorably because that person is single, married, separated, divorced or widowed.
  • Pregnancy
    Pregnancy discrimination involves treating a female applicant, employee or student unfavorably because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth.
  • Parenthood
    Parenthood discrimination involves treating a applicant, employee, or student unfavorably because of family or child care obligations.
  • Sexual Orientation

    Sexual Orientation discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee or student less favorably because of their sexual orientation.

    Sexual orientation is an enduring pattern of romantic or sexual attraction (or a combination of these) to persons of the opposite sex or gender, the same sex or gender, or to both sexes, or more than one gender. Sexual orientation is about who you are attracted to and who you feel drawn to romantically, emotionally, and sexually.

  • Gender Identity

    Gender Identity and Expression discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee or student less favorably because of that person’s gender identity or how that person has chosen to express their gender identity.

    “Gender” refers to the attitudes, feelings, roles and behaviors that a given culture or
    society associates with a person’s biological sex.

    "Gender Identity" refers to one's innermost concept of self as male, female, a blend of both or neither – how individuals perceive themselves and what they call themselves. One's gender identity can be the same or different from their sex assigned at birth.

    "Gender Expression" refers to external appearance of one's gender identity, usually expressed through behavior, clothing, haircut and/or voice, and which may or may not conform to socially defined behaviors and characteristics typically associated with being either masculine or feminine.

  • Political Affiliation / Beliefs

    Political Affiliation discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee or student less favorably because of that person’s affiliation to a political party or group.

    Political Belief discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee or student less favorably because of that person’s beliefs regarding politics. 

  • Genetic Information
    Genetic Information discrimination involves treating an applicant, employee or student less favorably because of that person’s genetic information. Genetic Information includes information about an individual’s genetic tests and the genetic tests of an individual’s family members, as well as information about the manifestation of a disease or disorder in an individual’s family members (i.e. family medical history). Family medical history is included in the definition of genetic information because it is often used to determine whether someone has an increased risk of getting a disease, disorder, or condition in the future. Genetic information also includes an individual's request for, or receipt of, genetic services, or the participation in clinical research that includes genetic services by the individual or a family member of the individual, and the genetic information of a fetus carried by an individual or by a pregnant woman who is a family member of the individual and the genetic information of any embryo legally held by the individual or family member using an assisted reproductive technology.

More information regarding protected categories can be found in BOR Policy 01.02.

Retaliation

The university prohibits retaliation (including retaliatory harassment) against individuals who report any form of discrimination or who participate in the university’s grievance process, even if the university ultimately concludes that no discrimination occurred.

All persons have the right to complain about any conduct which they reasonably believe constitutes discrimination. No one may take disciplinary or other adverse action against a person who genuinely but mistakenly believes himself or herself to be discriminated against, even if the practices complained of do not, in fact, constitute discrimination. 

Threats or other forms of intimidation or retaliation against complainants, respondents, witnesses or investigators will constitute a violation of this regulation and may be subject to separate administrative action, including termination for cause.

Retaliation may be reported to the Office of Equity and Compliance. If the alleged retaliation is reportedly caused by OEC staff, the retaliation may alternately be reported to the university’s chief human resources officer.

More on retaliation and its definition can be found in BOR Policy 01.02. and BOR Policy 01.04.