Show Schedule

January Shows

Show Title Show Date Show Time Show Description
Phantom of the Universe Friday, January 27th 6:30 PM

Phantom of the Universe reveals the first hints of its existence through the eyes of Fritz Zwicky, the scientist who coined the term "dark matter." It describes the astral choreography witnessed by Vera Rubin in the Andromeda galaxy and then plummets deep underground to see the most sensitive dark matter detector on Earth, housed in a former gold mine.

From there, it journeys across space and time to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, speeding alongside particles before they collide in visually stunning explosions of light and sound, while learning how scientists around the world are collaborating to track down the constituents of dark matter.

Chasing the Ghost Particle Friday, January 27th 8:00 PM

Deep in the ice at the heart of Antarctica, IceCube, the biggest and strangest detector in the world waits for mysterious messengers from the cosmos. Scientists are using tiny and elusive particles called neutrinos to explore the most extreme places in the universe. These ghostly neutrinos give us an exclusive way to study powerful cosmic engines like exploding stars and black holes. 

In this 30-minute show, stunning simulations of the most energetic places in our universe, and the galaxies around us, are the prelude to a thrilling journey inside IceCube, looking for traces of neutrino collisions in the ice. From one of the most remote locations on Earth to the unexplored regions of the cosmos, Chasing the Ghost Particle: From the South Pole to the Edge of the Universe will take you on a journey you won't forget.

February Shows

Show Title Show Date Show Time Show Description
Stars of the AK Sky Thursday, February 2nd 6:30 PM Have you ever looked up at the night sky and wondered what you were seeing? What is that bright object on the horizon? And where is the Big Dipper? In a special all-live presentation, we'll take you on a tour of the night sky and show you what you can see during our fall nights. You'll learn about what constellations are visible, how to look for the moon, and what planets you can see. And best of all, it will be a balmy 68 degrees inside the planetarium!
Asteroid: Mission Extreme Friday, February 10th 6:30 PM

Asteroid: Mission Extreme takes audiences on a journey 65 million years in the making to discover how asteroids are both a danger and an opportunity for those of us on planet Earth. The danger of course lies in the possibility of a cataclysmic collision; the opportunity is the crazy idea that asteroids could be stepping stones to other worlds — veritable way stations in space — allowing us to penetrate the deepest realms of the universe. The challenges are enormous, but the idea could ultimately save humankind. Explore with us the possibilities in Asteroid: Mission Extreme.

Asteroid: Mission Extreme Friday, February 10th 8:00 PM

Asteroid: Mission Extreme takes audiences on a journey 65 million years in the making to discover how asteroids are both a danger and an opportunity for those of us on planet Earth. The danger of course lies in the possibility of a cataclysmic collision; the opportunity is the crazy idea that asteroids could be stepping stones to other worlds — veritable way stations in space — allowing us to penetrate the deepest realms of the universe. The challenges are enormous, but the idea could ultimately save humankind. Explore with us the possibilities in Asteroid: Mission Extreme.

Fractals Friday, February 17th 6:30 PM

Fractals are all around us in the natural world, spanning a huge range of scales. The same patterns repeat themselves again and again, from the tiny branching of our blood vessels and neurons to the branching of trees, lightning bolts, and river networks.  Fractals also serve as intricately beautiful representations of the otherwise abstract world of mathematics.  They're surprisingly simple to make, but the closer you look at them, the more complexities you find.  Fractals Rock will take you on a visual tour of the endless fractal patterns of nature and magnify for you the infinite complexity of mathematical art. 

From Dream to Discovery Friday, February 17th 8:00 PM

While science focuses on discovering things about our natural world, engineering and invention is a purely human endeavor. It requires innovation, teamwork, experimentation, planning, and patience. By featuring real NASA missions that highlight the extreme nature of space engineering, the goal of the Museum of Science's planetarium show is to get middle school students and the general public excited about spacecraft engineering and interested in the engineering process. The five major aspects of a mission lifecycle—design, construction, testing, launch, and operations—are highlighted through examples of NASA missions, including the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the James Webb Space Telescope. Each of the show’s three sections starts with a setup question that defines the “problem” that an engineering team aims to solve, giving audiences a balanced, large-scale overview of spacecraft engineering, described contextually using exciting, real-life projects. The show’s major themes include problem solving to cope with expected—and unexpected—challenges, the importance of advance planning and testing, learning from mistakes, and working with a team.

NASA Space Update Friday, February 24th 6:30 PM

Learn about new and current space missions! Brought to you by NASA Solar System Ambassadors and Southcentral Alaska Astronomical Society members, NASA Space Update is a monthly program series that combines engaging presentations on space missions with a custom star show. After the program, stay for a Q&A session and discover new astronomy resources and free space goodies. New space topics each month, for you to get caught up with all of your space updates.

Kiuguyat: The Northern Lights Friday, February 24th 8:00 PM

Alaska's Far North is cloaked in darkness for much of the Arctic winter season. For Iñupiat people who live in this remote landscape, the beautiful dancing lights known as the Northern Lights are a welcome sight. What are the Northern Lights? How did they get there? What meaning do they hold for those who live beneath their splendor? This 25-minute fulldome video showcases the lights through stunning time-lapse photography and introduces the audience to Iñupiat elders and residents of all ages as they share traditional stories, songs, personal experiences and generational knowledge related to the lights. 

Animated visualizations depict the physical science processes that produce this fascinating high latitude phenomenon.

March Shows

Show Title Show Date Show Time Show Description
Stars of the AK Sky Thursday, March 2nd 6:30 PM Have you ever looked up at the night sky and wondered what you were seeing? What is that bright object on the horizon? And where is the Big Dipper? In a special all-live presentation, we'll take you on a tour of the night sky and show you what you can see during our fall nights. You'll learn about what constellations are visible, how to look for the moon, and what planets you can see. And best of all, it will be a balmy 68 degrees inside the planetarium!
NASA Space Update Friday, March 24th 6:30 PM

Learn about new and current space missions! Brought to you by NASA Solar System Ambassadors and Southcentral Alaska Astronomical Society members, NASA Space Update is a monthly program series that combines engaging presentations on space missions with a custom star show. After the program, stay for a Q&A session and discover new astronomy resources and free space goodies. New space topics each month, for you to get caught up with all of your space updates.

Asteroid: Mission Extreme Friday, March 24th 8:00 PM

Asteroid: Mission Extreme takes audiences on a journey 65 million years in the making to discover how asteroids are both a danger and an opportunity for those of us on planet Earth. The danger of course lies in the possibility of a cataclysmic collision; the opportunity is the crazy idea that asteroids could be stepping stones to other worlds — veritable way stations in space — allowing us to penetrate the deepest realms of the universe. The challenges are enormous, but the idea could ultimately save humankind. Explore with us the possibilities in Asteroid: Mission Extreme.

Icy Moons of the Solar System Friday, March 31st 6:30 PM

Show description coming soon...

Black Holes Friday, March 31st 8:00 PM

This fulldome show from Thomas Lucas Productions was developed in collaboration with Denver Museum of Nature & Science, NOVA and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. Narrated by Academy-Award nominated actor Liam Neeson, this cutting-edge production features high-resolution visualizations to bring the current science of black holes onto the dome.Audiences will be dazzled with striking, immersive animations of the formation of the early universe, star birth and death, the collision of giant galaxies, and a simulated flight into the super-massive black hole lurking at the center of our galaxy.

April Shows

Show Title Show Date Show Time Show Description
Stars of the AK Sky Thursday, April 6th 6:30 PM Have you ever looked up at the night sky and wondered what you were seeing? What is that bright object on the horizon? And where is the Big Dipper? In a special all-live presentation, we'll take you on a tour of the night sky and show you what you can see during our fall nights. You'll learn about what constellations are visible, how to look for the moon, and what planets you can see. And best of all, it will be a balmy 68 degrees inside the planetarium!
Escher's Universe Friday, April 14th 6:30 PM

Escher’s Universe is based on the life and work of the multifaceted Maurits Cornelis Escher.

This show will take us to the artist’s studio where his most iconic works are displayed. From this intimate and emotional place, we’ll visit Escher’s particular universe and we will be surprised by his ability to join Science and Art.

He uses mathematics, astronomy, optics, crystallography and geometry in his creations to artistically explain very complex concepts addressed by Cosmology. Escher’s shapes, three-dimensional reconstructions, dual worlds, unreal buildings or impossible continuities reveal his passion for knowledge.

NASA Space Update Friday, April 14th 8:00 PM

Learn about new and current space missions! Brought to you by NASA Solar System Ambassadors and Southcentral Alaska Astronomical Society members, NASA Space Update is a monthly program series that combines engaging presentations on space missions with a custom star show. After the program, stay for a Q&A session and discover new astronomy resources and free space goodies. New space topics each month, for you to get caught up with all of your space updates.

A Place Like No Other Friday, April 21st 6:30 PM

Alaska is a place like no other. For many people a trip to Alaska is a life-long dream. For the people who live here, they depend on and protect an enduring way of life. But there are places in our state so remote, so wild, that few Alaskans have ever gone. Here in the planetarium we're going to take you to these places, to remote wilderness to see iconic animals and landscapes that define the Last Frontier, places that make Alaska...Alaska.

Habitat Earth Friday, April 21st 8:00 PM

In Habitat Earth, plunge below the ocean’s surface to explore the dynamic relationships found in deep ocean ecosystems; dig beneath the forest floor to see how Earth’s tallest trees rely on tiny fungi to survive; and soar to new heights to witness the intricate intersection between human and ecological networks.

Narrated by Frances McDormand, our award-winning original planetarium show features stunning visualizations of both biological and human-built networks (and of how they intersect), taking show-goers on an incredible, immersive journey through the interconnectedness of life on Earth.

Asteroid: Mission Extreme Friday, April 28th 6:30 PM

Asteroid: Mission Extreme takes audiences on a journey 65 million years in the making to discover how asteroids are both a danger and an opportunity for those of us on planet Earth. The danger of course lies in the possibility of a cataclysmic collision; the opportunity is the crazy idea that asteroids could be stepping stones to other worlds — veritable way stations in space — allowing us to penetrate the deepest realms of the universe. The challenges are enormous, but the idea could ultimately save humankind. Explore with us the possibilities in Asteroid: Mission Extreme.

Scales of the Universe Friday, April 28th 8:00 PM

How big is the Universe? Does it go on forever? What is the most distant object we can see? We'll answer all of these questions and more in a special all-live presentation. Starting from the Earth, we will fly out of our Solar System, beyond our galaxy the Milky Way, and to the edge of the observable Universe!

Get your tickets here!

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Please note that this schedule may need to change.  If the demand is high, we will work to offer additional shows.  To be notified when new public shows are scheduled or the schedule changes, please join our mailing list.

Online Ticket Prices:
  • FREE for current UAA Planetarium Members
  • $10 for Adults
  • $ 5 for UAA Students (w/ valid ID)
  • $ 5 for Youth (12 and under)

Tickets sold in advance at UAATix.com.

At the Door Ticket Prices*:
  • FREE for current UAA Planetarium Members
  • $12 for Adults
  • $ 6 for UAA Students (w/ valid ID)
  • $ 6 for Children (4-18 years)
  • At the Door sales are credit card only

*ticket prices have been raised to include the ticketing fee

We have shows every week September-April except the first Friday. Our schedule continues into the summer with at least 2 show nights a month. Our 60 minute shows usually highlights one of our immersive, fulldome films followed by a presentation from one of our community's expert scientists, plus time for questions from the audience at the end of every show. We also have our all-live planetarium shows which feature the immense Planetarium database where one of our Astronomers will fly you through the Scales of the Universe, Stars of the Alaskan Sky, or show you our Tilted Solstice.

Because of the popularity of our public shows, we strongly recommend that you reserve seats in advance at UAATix.com Because the theater is dark and can be scary for young children, we do not recommend bringing children under the age of 4. Some shows have bright lights and moving scenery which could cause motion sickness or seizures. There are routes out of the planetarium if you start to feel any ill effects.

Individual and Student members may reserve one seat per show, while Family and Organizational members (and above) may reserve up to four seats per show.  Online reservations are free for members, and non-members can purchase tickets online with a credit card.  Seats may typically be reserved online until 5pm the day of the show. All remaining tickets will be sold at the door on a first-come, first-served basis on the night of the show.  We will be accepting cash and card at the door. Even if a show is sold out, we typically have a few seats available on the night of the show.  The planetarium will open for seating 30 minutes before each show.  You must be in the theater 10 minutes before the show starts.  Unclaimed reserve seats will be released after this time to stand-by customers.  There is no entry after the show begins.

For questions about the planetarium, our shows, or how to make reservations on UAATix.com, please contact the planetarium staff via email at planetarium@alaska.edu or by phone at (907) 786-1838.  Should you require to cancel your public show reservations, please let us know!  

Can't make it on Friday nights? Don't like sitting next to strangers in a dark room? You and up to 63 friends can book the planetarium for a private show! Our private shows are available all year long and can be tailored to your request. We have discounted rates for school and youth groups as well. For pricing and availability email us at planetarium@alaska.edu.