Frequently Asked Questions

  • Why am I receiving a SAP letter if I didn't use financial aid?

    Because we cannot predict each student’s need for financial aid, we monitor all enrolled UAA students for SAP, whether or not they applied for or received financial aid. This is done to assist students to maintain an awareness of their SAP status and their ability to receive financial aid in the future should they need it.

  • If I withdraw from a class, how will this affect my financial aid?

    Financial Aid recipients are required to make Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). The consequences of withdrawing from a class vary, and can only be determined by looking at the your current SAP standing and course load. Generally speaking, if you are currently making SAP, you must complete at least two thirds (66.6%) of your required credits and maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative* GPA.

    • Example: During your first term of attendance you are enrolled in 12 credits. You would need to complete at least 8 of those credits to have completed the term at > 66.6% and have a 2.0 to be in good standing
    • At the end of your second term you are again taking twelve credits and you only complete 6. Your cumulative (all terms combined) completion ratio would be 14 earned credits out of 24 attempted (58%). Because you have dropped below 66.6%, you will be placed on "warning". After your first semester of warning, if you do not meet the minimum GPA and completion ratio, you will become ineligible for future financial aid. It is therefore very important to pass all the classes you attempt. You can view your current academic progress status by regularly checking your  UAOnline account.

    Even if withdrawal doesn't affect your SAP, remember the importance of Staying on Track, and the personal consequences of paying for a class that you have not completed.

    *All terms combined

  • If I withdraw from all my classes, how will that affect my financial aid?

    Financial Aid recipients are required to earn a passing grade in all federally-funded courses. Eligibility for aid must therefore be recalculated if you withdraw from or cease attending all of your classes prior to completing more than 60% of an enrolled term. Withdrawal from all classes not only affects your Satisfactory Academic Progress, but carries various other consequences based upon your “last date of attendance.*” Recalculations in your aid may result in a debt and/or hold placed on your account, based on the percent of the term completed.

    * In this case, the Office of Student Financial Assistance defines the "last date of attendance" as the latest recorded withdrawal on your student account during the semester. (e.g. If you register for two classes, withdraw from one on Monday, and another on Tuesday, then Tuesday is the official "last date of attendance" for that semester.)

  • What does it mean to "complete your program within a 150% timeframe"?

    One of the main components of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is the "150% rule." When you attempt more than 150% of the credits required for your primary degree program, you can no longer receive financial aid. For example, if you are in a baccalaureate program, you must complete the program before attempting 180 credits or else your financial aid will be suspended. Many students who return to UAA for a second degree will be considered in violation of the 150% rule. Students in violation of the 150% rule may appeal the suspension of their financial aid through the SAP appeal process. For more information, visit the Financial Aid Policies webpage.

  • I’ve got a class that I can’t finish on time and my Professor has agreed to give me an Incomplete. How will this affect my SAP status?

    Your professor may agree to issue an Incomplete grade if you’ve been doing well in your class but aren’t able to complete the class on time for unavoidable reasons. An incomplete grade simply indicates that you haven’t finished all the coursework required for a grade and the professor has agreed to give you until an established deadline to finish it. Unfortunately, until you’re able to finish the class, the incomplete grade will remain on your transcript as attempted but not earned and will count against your completion rate (67% rule).

    Once the outstanding coursework is finished, your professor will replace the incomplete grade with your new earned grade.  You will need to notify the Office of Student Financial Assistance when this is done so we may update your SAP status to reflect the finished coursework. 

  • I’ve already received my award notice and I am already registered for the fall semester. Why am I just now learning about the SAP issue?

    Satisfactory Academic Progress is checked after each semester’s grades become official. During the spring and summer semesters, financial aid is being awarded for the upcoming academic year so students can prepare for their financial needs. If your SAP status changed after your award was generated you will no longer be eligible for the financial aid offered. Changing degree programs may also affect your SAP status and your eligibility for financial aid.

  • I need to know if I can still apply for student loans if my eligibility for financial aid is suspended? I had a couple horrible semesters. Can I still take out a student loan so I can keep going to school?

    At this time you are ineligible for Federal Direct Loans.  However, you may be eligible for an Alternative Student Loan from a private lender. Not all alternative loan lenders require that students be meeting satisfactory academic progress. Contact potential lenders for more information regarding their eligibility requirements. You may also find that the Satisfactory Academic Progress appeal process is appropriate for your circumstances.

  • If I appeal, what are the chances that my appeal will be granted?

    Because appeals are examined on a case-by-case basis we are unable to predict the outcome of your appeal. We recommend students consider appealing their status if they feel they have exceptional or unusual circumstances that affected their ability to meet the minimum SAP standards.

  • Do I have to be admitted into in a degree program to appeal my SAP status?

    Students who are Non-Degree Seeking are not eligible for Federal Financial Aid. To have an appeal considered students must be actively seeking and enrolled in an eligible degree or certificate program.

  • Will my transfer credits from other schools count toward my SAP status?

    Yes, credits from other institutions transferred to and accepted by UAA will count towards the Cumulative Completion Rate & 150% Maximum Timeframe SAP standards.

  • I’ve had to repeat several classes, does that affect SAP?

    Repeated courses often impact SAP. Some courses are repeatable for credit, but some courses are not. If a course is repeated for credit, it is counted as both attempted and earned equally. However, if a student repeats a course that is not considered ‘repeatable for credit’, then that course is only earned one time, no matter how many times it is attempted. If you have repeated one or more classes in which you had already received a passing grade (such as a D), the credits are only counted as earned or completed the first time you receive a passing grade. This can negatively impact the 67% completion standard.

  • I’m thinking about changing my major, will that affect my SAP status?

    When students change their degree program or major, all credits previously attempted (including those for any previous degree or major) will be counted in their 150% maximum timeframe calculation. This may mean that you have taken courses that no longer apply to your major but are still counted in your 150% calculation, preventing you from completing your degree within the 150% maximum timeframe for your new major.

  • What is the appeal deadline?

    Completed appeal forms and documentation must be received no later than two weeks prior to the end of the semester for which you are appealing. Processing may take several weeks, so be sure to submit your appeal as quickly as possible.

  • What if I miss the appeal deadline?

    If your appeal is received after the appeal deadline, it will be placed under consideration for the upcoming semester.

  • What happens if a student withdraws during a semester in which they are on financial aid probation?

    If a student withdraws during a semester in which they are on probation, the eligibility will be measured at the end of the semester and the student will be placed on “suspension” from financial aid.

  • I finished all the required classes for my degree last semester, why can’t I receive financial aid this semester?

    Federal Regulations limit financial aid to the classes required for your current degree program. Once a student completes the academic requirements for a program they are no longer eligible for further financial aid for that degree program, whether or not they have received their degree or not.

    Similarly, financial aid and appeals will not be approved for students who have completed thee academic requirements for their program but are taking classes while ‘waiting’ to get into a new program or school.

  • My SAP appeal was just approved, why can’t I take extra fun classes?

    To meet federal regulations and to help students be successful while on probation, UAA requires that students limit their registration to only those classes required for their current degree program.  UAA does this so that students may focus on meeting the stringent requirements of SAP probation.

  • I’m taking several ESL (English as a Second Language) classes.  Will they count toward my SAP status?

    Yes, ESL classes are included in all SAP calculations.  It’s important to note that such courses are included even though they may not apply toward degree completion requirements.  This may negatively impact the 150% maximum timeframe standard.

  • I have been thinking about pursuing a second degree, how will that affect my SAP status?

    When students change their degree program or major, all credits previously attempted (including those for any previous degree or major) will be counted in their 150% maximum timeframe calculation. This may mean that you have taken courses that no longer apply to your major but are still counted in your 150% calculation, preventing you from completing your degree within the 150% maximum timeframe for your new major.