Daniel Keopke

Daniel Koepke

Term Instructor
Department of Physics & Astronomy
NSB 211
907.786.1237
dkoepke@alaska.edu

Education

  • Master of Science, Montana State University Physics Department, Bozeman (2008)
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Maryland Philosophy Department, College Park (2006)
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Maryland Physics Department, College Park (2005)

Biography

Dan Koepke enthusiastically joins our Dept of Physics & Astronomy as Laboratory Manager & Term Instructor after serving as an Anatomy & Physiology Adjunct Faculty in the Dept of Biological Sciences.  He earned a Physics MS from Montana State U, & both a Philosophy BA and a Physics BS from the U of Maryland.  Dan's professional leadership & scientific research spans the globe from China to Europe and across our country.  Laboratory science's application to health & quality of life inspires his passion to serve students and colleagues at UAA.

Teaching Responsibilities

  • ASTR103L Solar System Astronomy Laboratory
  • PHYS123L Basic Physics I Laboratory
  • PHYS123R Basic Physics I Problem Solving
  • PHYS212L General Physics II Laboratory
  • PHYS212R General Physics II Problem Solving
  • BIOL 111L Anatomy & Physiology I Laboratory (Spring 2016)

Professional & Department Service

Lab Manager & Term Instructor

Research Interests

  • Nonlinear Spectroscopy & Quantum Optics - particularly multi-photon & excited-state absorption
  • Photodynamic Therapy
  • High-Altitude Homeostasis & Physiology
  • Psychophysiology

Publications

Contributor, “A Father’s Day Tribute”, Bissett, J., The Dominion Post (June 19, 2016) about solo-summit of Mount Rainier in honor of my father Dr. Mark Koepke

Ruth Glacier Expedition Funhogs Anonymous, Scree, about June 2013 14-day expedition in Denali National Park, Alaska (November 2014)

Translator, M. Göppert-Mayer, “Elementary processes with two quantum transitions”, Annalen der Physik 7-8 [18], 466 – 479 (2009). Republished as a historic article and original English translation of the Nobel laureate’s frequently-cited Göttingen doctoral dissertation {'Über Elementarakte mit zwei Quantensprüngen' , Annalen der Physik 9 [401], 273-294 (1931)}